Author: Caitlyn Gillespie

Long-term monitoring project in Eastern Oregon will help biologists study trends in sagebrush-associated bird populations

The Great Basin Bird Conservation Region (BCR 9) is shown in light gray in this map of the United States’ western BCRs.

In 2019, KBO partnered with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to initiate a new long-term bird monitoring project in eastern Oregon as part of the Integrated Monitoring for Bird Conservation Regions (IMBCR) program that is coordinated by Bird Conservancy of the Rockies. This eastern Oregon bird monitoring project is an expansion of the IMBCR long-term monitoring program that is being implemented to better understand long-term bird population trends in North America’s Bird Conservation Regions, or BCRs. Our fieldwork brought us far from our home in Ashland, Oregon to monitor birds in the sagebrush habitats of eastern Oregon, stretching KBO’s point count program out all the way to the Idaho border!

One important benefit of KBO reaching out into eastern Oregon is that we helped to complete IMBCR’s coverage of the Great Basin BCR (BCR 9) and the sagebrush habitats of the west. Big Sagebrush is an important plant species for Greater Sage Grouse and this high desert shrub makes up an important component of the at-risk sagebrush ecosystems that other species of concern depend on, including Brewer’s Sparrow, Sage Thrasher, Sagebrush Sparrow, and Short-eared Owl.

Brewer’s Sparrow

The IMBCR program started in 2008 and now covers nine BCRs in 16 states across the western United States. The goal of the program is to use a consistent, statistically rigorous design and protocol to provide complete and current information about bird distributions, abundances, and population trends over time. In addition to meeting BLM’s long-term goals, this new project strives to meet other BLM district-level information needs in Oregon. For example, IMBCR data can be used to understand ecological conditions, identify research needs, and provide valuable information for management and conservation planning.

Klamath Bird Observatory will collaborate with Bird Conservancy of the Rockies on broad scale analyses of individual species occupancy and density and results will be incorporated into reports, peer-reviewed publications, and decision support tools. The IMBCR dataset will be available to address both short-term management questions and long-term monitoring needs specific to BLM districts in eastern Oregon for years to come.

KBO Begins New Long-Term Monitoring Study in the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument lies at the heart of a unique ecological landscape less than 20 miles outside of KBO’s home in Ashland, OR. This summer, with the support of the Medford BLM, KBO initiated a new long-term monitoring study which aims to understand the bird communities within the oak and grassland habitats in the Monument.

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Bird Banding Workshop and Field Course

Klamath Bird Observatory is offering two unique opportunities to participate in our long-term landbird monitoring program. A Bird Banding Workshop at KBO’s Upper Klamath Field Station in southern Oregon on August 5-9 2019 and a Bird Banding Field Course, a 10-30 day opportunity to immerse yourself in the life of a field ornithologist and obtain a comprehensive introduction to bird banding and other field methodologies.

CLICK HERE to read more about these exciting bird banding opportunities.

Species List Cover (96 dpi)20190123Aeea

A Checklist of Bird Species Detected along the Bear Creek Riparian Corridor, Ashland, Oregon

Species List Cover (96 dpi)20190123AeeaThis species list was generated using the Avian Knowledge Network Phenology Tool. The tool generates a graph that provides our best understanding of when birds are most likely to be present in a selected area. The graphs presented in this checklist represent birds within the Bear Creek corridor from Clay Creek to Ashland Ponds in Ashland.

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Year of the Bird: December Call to Action-Sharing Your Love of Birds!

The Year of the Bird has almost come to an end. As we finish out 2018, the last monthly call to action is about thanks and sharing your love of birds this holiday season with the people in your life. Over the past year, The Year of the Bird has focused on planting native plants, avoiding plastic, participating in community science, making your home bird-friendly, and many more ways to help bird populations around the world. Thank you for participating! During this holiday season, share the ways you love birds with those around you. This could be done in many forms, such as taking someone on a bird walk, sharing birding photography, gifting a bird-related present, or donating to a conservation group. Although the year is coming to an end, supporting healthy bird populations should not. End this year by sharing with others the joys birds bring to you.

CLICK HERE to visit Klamath Bird Observatory’s website to make an end-of-the-Year of the Bird Donation.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the Year of the Bird.

SEOW (Jim Livaudias 72 ppi 2x3 cropped)

Short-eared Owls

SEOW  (Jim Livaudias 72 ppi 2x3 cropped) 

The Western Asio Flammeus Landscape Study (WAfLS) is a community science project designed to gather information to better evaluate the population status of this species. Such information is needed by conservation practitioners who want to design management actions that will reverse the Short-eared Owl population declines. The Western Asio Flammeus Landscape Study (WAfLS) is a community science project designed to gather information to better evaluate the population status of this species. Such information is needed by conservation practitioners who want to design management actions that will reverse the Short-eared Owl population declines.

Project WAfLS is an eight-state program designed to assess the population status, trends, and threats against the Short-eared Owl, an enigmatic, open-country species. Project WAfLS engages enthusiastic citizen-scientist volunteers across the west to gather critical survey data, enabling a rigorous assessment of the status of this species. Our results directly influence high-value conservation actions by state and federal agencies, and our volunteers are rewarded with training and experience in critical observation, the scientific method, data collection, and regularly report unique and exciting observations.

Get involved or learn more about this project on Avian Knowledge Northwest. 

eBird NW Logo (72ppi 4xX) (4)

eBird Northwest

eBird NW Logo (72ppi 4xX) (4)eBird Northwest serves as the primary community science application of Avian Knowledge Northwest by providing content and services to bird‐watching and natural resource management audiences in northern California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and the surrounding areas. eBird Northwest serves as the primary community science application of Avian Knowledge Northwest by providing content and services to bird‐watching and natural resource management audiences in northern California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and the surrounding areas. 

Klamath Bird Observatory, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW),Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service Region 1 (Pacific), and Pacific Birds in collaboration with Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology and many conservation partners, have developed eBird Northwest, building a broad regional partnership around the eBird community science application. eBird Northwest is a regional portal of Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s international eBird program. An eBird Northwest Content Committee is actively generating stories, articles, notes, and other tools of interest to birders and conservation practitioners in the Northwest. Additionally, a Community Science Committee is working with partners, developing relevant, regional eBird projects that are linked or hosted through eBird Northwest.  These projects address specific objectives, meet data needs, and encourage users to contribute data that will inform conservation.

Oregon Vesper Sparrow with color bands (c) Frank Lospalluto

Field Notes and Early Findings

Oregon Vesper Sparrow with color bands (c) Frank Lospalluto
Oregon Vesper Sparrow with color bands (c) Frank Lospalluto

In 2018, Klamath Bird Observatory began in-depth monitoring of the survival, nest success, and habitat preferences of Rogue Basin birds located near Howard Prairie, east of Ashland, Oregon. This research is being replicated by partners in the Willamette Valley in Oregon, and the Puget Lowlands in Washington

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541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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