Author: KBO

Oak Landowner Guide Available Now!

A popular free outreach publication authored by Klamath Bird Observatory and Lomakatsi Restoration Project that provides guidance for private landowners interested in implementing oak habitat restoration on their land, originally published in 2015 , has been re-printed with some minor updates and is available now. The document, entitled Restoring Oak Habitats in Southern Oregon and Northern California: A Guide for Private Landowners, emerged from a collaborative project involving a suite of private and public conservation partners, including the Bureau of Land Management (Medford District), US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Klamath Basin Audubon Society, Oregon State University, American Bird Conservancy, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Understory Initiative, and Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network.

The landowner guide provides detailed oak restoration guidelines for achieving desired conditions in oak stands, such as diverse habitat structures, large oak trees, and the presence of snags, downed wood native shrubs and perennial grasses. The guide also includes supplemental resources for private landowners, including a list of organizations that will assist with private lands restoration as well as step-by-step instructions for monitoring birds to track the return of native wildlife following oak restoration activities. The new printing also includes some new information about oak chaparral habitats, based on new research that focused on determining how chaparral patch size influences the habitat for chaparral-associated birds.

The landowner guide is available for free download on Avian Knowledge Northwest here.

Using a bird’s eye view to help balance wildlife habitat needs and fire-resilient forests

This post first appeared on Rogue Forest Partners.

Rogue Forest Partners are working across public and private lands to reduce risks of unnaturally extreme wildfires, promote climate adaptation, and restore resilient landscapes in the Rogue Basin. Klamath Bird Observatory is working with Rogue Forest Partners to apply science using birds as ecological indicators to inform restoration planning and measure ecological response. The partnership aligns with Klamath Bird Observatory’s mission to advance bird conservation and specifically aligns with our work to halt and reverse the decline of western forest birds.

Birds are excellent indicators of forest structure and composition. Applying what we know about birds can inform landscape-level planning and restoration treatments within individual stands. Conservation planning strives to achieve restoration goals that benefit entire forests and the animals that inhabit them. We identify current and desired forest conditions and recommend restoration prescription components by applying what we know about habitat needs for select avian species and vegetation management goals (for example, encouraging old-growth forest conditions or reducing fuel loads). We then conduct bird and vegetation monitoring to measure restoration treatment effectiveness and see if changes in the forest are on track to meet restoration goals.

Pacific-slope Flycatcher, photo by Frank Lospalluto

Songbirds are one component of Rogue Forest Partners’ broader monitoring strategy. The objective of bird monitoring is to improve our understanding of ecological conditions following habitat restoration, using birds as indicators of environmental change. Birds are widely recognized as excellent ecological and management indicators and are relatively easy and cost-effective to monitor.

Data from bird monitoring, such as which bird species are present and how abundant they are, provide meaningful information that can be used to quantify the benefits of restoration, measure progress towards restoration goals, and evaluate wildlife response.

Successful restoration should lead to more abundant and successfully reproducing bird populations—especially for species closely associated with essential vegetation features of healthy coniferous forests, such as large, mature trees and a multi-layered tree canopy. If we don’t observe the expected before-and-after changes in the bird community, we can work with land managers to adjust the vegetation treatments to create better habitat for birds and other wildlife.

Data on how wildlife use the restored habitats provide a more meaningful and multi-dimensional assessment of restoration success than surveying vegetation alone. They can help tell the story of restoration progress.

Contributed by KBO’s Jaime Stephens, Sarah Rockwell, and Caitlyn Gillespie

Two new job opportunities at Klamath Bird Observatory

We are seeking applicants for two new full time positions:

Join KBO’s team and help us address the unprecedented bird crisis — nearly three billion North American birds have been lost since 1970, despite a myriad of conservation efforts. Birds are indicators of healthy places, fresh water, and clean air, and thus their declines are symbolic of the decline in the sustainability of the places we live, so we must act now. If you are interested in science-driven conservation and want to become a contributing member of KBO’s collaborative team of kind, loyal, passionate, supportive, dedicated, and understanding colleagues, we encourage you to apply now.

Klamath Bird Observatory achieves bird conservation in the Pacific Northwest and throughout the ranges of our migratory birds. Emphasizing high-caliber science and the role of birds as indicators, we inform and improve natural resource management. Klamath Bird Observatory’s collaborative conservation planning approach is fueled by: 1) Long-term monitoring that provides information about changes in bird populations; 2) In-depth theoretical research that advances our understanding of distribution and movements; and 3) Applied ecology that addresses natural resource management challenges. Recognizing that conservation occurs across many fronts, we also nurture an environmental ethic through community outreach and education. Through career development, community and professional education, and international capacity building, KBO has a history and commitment to diversifying the fields of conservation science and sustainability education.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

REMINDER: “History Walk into the Past” FUNdraiser — Sunday, July 25th

This event is part of KBO’s 2021-2022 FUNdrasing Campaign — a series of events hosted by members of our Board of Directors. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE
On our “Walk into the Past”, we’ll be joined (at least “joined in spirit”) by this group of Ashlanders from about 1910.

The first of our two “history walk” FUNdraisers is coming up on Sunday July 25. KBO Board member Jeff LaLande (archaeologist and historian) will take donors on a trip into Ashland’s past — from the Shasta Indians’ village where the Plaza is now and on through changes of recent decades. This history walk is meant to enrich your own experience of the town. Plus, by attending, your will be supporting KBO’s science driven bird conservation efforts.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the “History Walk into the Past” through Ashland’s Historic Core FUNdraising events.

To register contact Jeff, at: 541-778-3257 or jmaxlalande@gmail.com

Birdwatching at Dunn Ranch with the Klamath Bird Observatory (July 8th)

Klamath Bird Observatory is excited about our new partnership with the Dunn Ranch Center for Food and Agriculture. At Dunn Ranch they choose nature and demonstrate regenerative farming and a food culture that supports human and planet health. Their mission is “to learn, innovate, and rebuild our food system.” Together, in collaboration with Dunn Ranch, we are advancing bird and habitat conservation through science, education, and partnerships.

Join us Thursday July 8th from 7:00 to 10:00 AM for our second family bird watching field trip at Dunn Ranch.

KBO President Shannon Rio will lead an early morning birding walk helping participants to learn birds by the sounds they make, as well as by seeing them. Plan on a leisurely two hour walk followed by coffee and breakfast snacks and a discussion on what birds live on the Dunn Ranch property, with a focus on bird behaviors — what is that bird doing and why?!All levels welcome. Binoculars available. Bring water.

CLICK HERE to register for this KBO-Dunn Ranch Workshop

oaks from flyer 72ppi

Job Announcement: Restoration Ecologist and Partnerships Coordinator (Full Time)


Job Title: Restoration Ecologist and Partnerships Coordinator (Full Time)
Salary: $43,000 to $44,000 plus a 15% cash benefit (in lieu of health coverage)
Location: Ashland, Oregon; regular travel required
Application: Send a cover letter, resume, writing sample (report or manuscript), and 3 professional references to Jaime Stephens (jlh@klamathbird.org)
Application Deadline Extended: Review of applications will begin July 26th and will continue until position is filled


oaks from flyer 72ppi

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Job Announcement: Science Delivery, Communications, Outreach, & DEI Program Manager (Full Time)


Job Title: Science Delivery, Communications, Outreach, & DEI Program Manager (Full Time)
Salary: $43,000 to $44,000 plus a 15% cash benefit (in lieu of health coverage)
Location: Ashland, Oregon; regular travel required
Application: Send cover letter, resume, and contact information for 3 references, attached to an email with the subject “Science Delivery, Communications, Outreach, & DEI Program Manager” to jmm@KlamathBird.org.
Application Deadline Extended: Accepting application through September 20, 2021


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REMINDER: YOBIRD, a KBO summer FUNdraiser

This event is part of KBO’s 2021-2022 FUNdrasing Campaign — a series of events hosted by members of our Board of Directors. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

On July 11th, join Lisa Michelbrink and other KBO Board members at Grizzly Peak Winery. We will start with a gentle yoga session under the oak trees, led by Board President and yoga teacher, Shannon Rio. We will then take a bird walk on the winery grounds. To finish the morning, we will share light refreshments and conversation.

CLICK HERE to learn more about this FUNdraising event.

Contact Lisa Michelbrink, KBO Board member, at ljmichel@mac.com with any questions and to register.

CLICK HERE to contact Lisa.

A KBO FUNdraiser: “History Walk into the Past” through Ashland’s Historic Core

These events are part of KBO’s 2021-2022 FUNdrasing Campaign — a series of events hosted by members of our Board of Directors. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE
On our “Walk into the Past”, we’ll be joined (at least “joined in spirit”) by this group of Ashlanders from about 1910.

Although maybe not quite as exciting as having an actual “time machine,” KBO Board member Jeff LaLande (archaeologist and historian) will take you on a trip into Ashland’s past — from the Shasta Indians’ village where the Plaza is now and on through changes of recent decades. This history walk is meant to enrich your own experience of the town. (Plus, all of your $$s go to KBO!)

Choose to join one of the two “history walks”: July 25 and August 8. Both walks will follow the same route, and each of them will last about three hours.

The walk will be followed (i.e., the Covid situation at that time permitting) by outdoor enjoyment of your own choice of “cheerful beverage” and light meal at a downtown eatery — with Jeff picking up the tab.

  • When: Sunday, July 25, 11:30 AM and Sunday, August 8, 11:30 AM
  • Where: We will meet at a yet-to-be-designated location downtown. We’ll spend time at the Plaza, N. Main Street, the Granite St./Skidmore neighborhood, and along
  • Main St. out towards the Library.)
  • Max. number of people for each history walk: 14.
  • Cost per person:$75.

How to register: Contact Jeff, at 541-778-3257 or jmaxlalande@gmail.com

YOBIRD, a KBO summer FUNdraiser

This event is part of KBO’s 2021-2022 FUNdrasing Campaign — a series of events hosted by members of our Board of Directors. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Join members of the KBO board for a morning of yoga and birding at Grizzly Peak Winery. Shannon Rio will lead an hour of gentle yoga outdoors under the oaks followed by light refreshments and conversation and 1.5 hours of birding beautiful Grizzly Peak Winery.

All levels of yoga are welcome! Even if you have never experienced a yoga class, try this one. Simple postures and focus on breathing will enhance being in the present moment. Just like birdwatching, it brings calmness and a simple quiet joy. Bring your own binoculars if you have them. We can pro-vide some binoculars if needed. Plan on having fun!

  • When: Sunday morning July 11th 7:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
  • Where: Grizzly Peak Winery, 1600 E. Nevada St., Ashland
  • Suggested Donation: $75
  • Participant limit: 15. Preregistration is required!

Contact Lisa Michelbrink, KBO Board member, at ljmichel@mac.com with any questions and to register. CLICK HERE to contact Lisa.

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Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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Tax ID# 93-1297400

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