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Klamath Call Note

KBO Community Education: “Hot Times – Their Money or Your Life” with Harry Fuller

In this presentation on December 21, 2020, Harry Fuller will discuss the ongoing impacts of climate change and how all creatures, especially our Oregon birds, are pressed to adapt to changing environments. Can all species adapt to these changes? Which species might benefit, and which species might “lose?” Harry will share the “knowns” and “unknowns” according to current science, and describe what actions people can take to help mitigate the impacts of a changing climate. Click to learn more and sign up.

KBO Community Education: “Birding the Klamath Basin” with Shannon Rio

The Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge is one of the most amazing Wildlife Refuges in our country. It is the first refuge protected specifically for the benefit of migratory birds. We invite you to join Shannon Rio on December 7th via Zoom for “Birding the Klamath Basin,” a virtual visit to Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge in winter, where you will learn how to find your way to the refuge and get to know the glorious birds you might see there during this chilly time of year. Click to learn more!

NEWS RELEASE: Oak associated bird community benefits from restoration, new paper shows

Oak ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest are highly biodiverse and host more than 300 vertebrate species; yet a significant proportion of historic oak ecosystems in the region have been lost, and most remaining habitat is in a degraded state. Songbirds that are closely associated with oak ecosystems have experienced concerning declines, which is one of the reasons why research and restoration in oak habitats are priorities in our region. A new study from Klamath Bird Observatory describes a restoration and monitoring project that sought to reduce factors that stress oak trees and improve functioning in oak-associated plant communities. The researchers studied the effectiveness of the oak restoration by monitoring birds both before and after oak restoration.

Please consider making a contribution to Klamath Bird Observatory this Giving Tuesday

KBO’s resilience is inspired by the support we receive from our donors who believe in our work to advance bird and habitat conservation through science, education, and partnerships. In 2020, as the Covid pandemic challenged all of us, KBO showed our resilience, adapting to the novel circumstances. Giving Tuesday is December 1st, and this year we ask that you help us with our continued efforts to protect birds and the places in nature that they need to survive. Please consider making an end-of-year donation to KBO.

Long-term monitoring project in Eastern Oregon will help biologists study trends in sagebrush-associated bird populations

In 2019, KBO partnered with the Bureau of Land Management to initiate a new long-term bird monitoring project in eastern Oregon as part of the Integrated Monitoring for Bird Conservation Regions (IMBCR) program. Our fieldwork brought us far from our home in Ashland, Oregon to monitor birds in the sagebrush habitats of eastern Oregon, stretching KBO’s point count program out all the way to the Idaho border!

NEWS RELEASE: Rufous Hummingbird — Conserving the West’s most imperiled hummingbird

A new report published by the Western Hummingbird Partnership, “Rufous Hummingbird: State of the Science and Conservation,” illuminates in colorful images and graphics the biology and ecology of this tiny dynamo and highlights the many gaps in information that impede our ability to effectively protect it.

SCIENCE BRIEF: Research indicates that restoring urban riparian habitats benefits non-breeding birds

Healthy riparian habitat is vital for Neotropical migrant and resident birds. It supports high biodiversity, and it is increasingly rare across landscapes. The total area of riparian habitat in California and Oregon has declined significantly in recent years and so have its associated bird populations. Human activity and other disturbances contribute to the loss of this scarce and essential bird habitat. Scientists, conservation practitioners, and land managers are collaborating to restore key riparian areas to health, and to understand how bird responses to restoration efforts can indicate restoration success.

KBO Community Education Returns with Two New Classes in November 2020

Join Shannon Rio for an outdoor Lunch and Learn “Birding at North Mountain Park” on November 13th, and a virtual class “Wintering Birds of the Rogue Valley” on November 16th via Zoom. Click to learn more!

KBO Begins New Long-Term Monitoring Study in the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument lies at the heart of a unique ecological landscape less than 20 miles outside of KBO’s home in Ashland, OR. This summer, with the support of the Medford BLM, KBO initiated a new long-term monitoring study which aims to understand the bird communities within the oak and grassland habitats in the Monument.

NEWS RELEASE: Migratory songbirds are not likely to show fidelity to molting sites

When playing at home, sports teams usually benefit from home-field advantage. A similar advantage exists among migratory birds that return to the same nesting site year after year to find familiar surroundings, food, and neighbors. The act of returning to the same site—site fidelity—has been documented in songbirds during nesting season for decades; however, what has remained a mystery is whether or not songbirds exhibit a similar site fidelity after the breeding season, during their annual molt, or replacement of feathers.

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Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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KBO is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt non-profit organization. Charitable donations to KBO are tax-deductible.
Tax ID# 93-1297400

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