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NEWS RELEASE: Rufous Hummingbird — Conserving the West’s most imperiled hummingbird

A new report published by the Western Hummingbird Partnership, “Rufous Hummingbird: State of the Science and Conservation,” illuminates in colorful images and graphics the biology and ecology of this tiny dynamo and highlights the many gaps in information that impede our ability to effectively protect it.

SCIENCE BRIEF: Research indicates that restoring urban riparian habitats benefits non-breeding birds

| Debra Agnew | , , , , | Comments Off on NEWS RELEASE: Rufous Hummingbird — Conserving the West’s most imperiled hummingbird
Healthy riparian habitat is vital for Neotropical migrant and resident birds. It supports high biodiversity, and it is increasingly rare across landscapes. The total area of riparian habitat in California and Oregon has declined significantly in recent years and so have its associated bird populations. Human activity and other disturbances contribute to the loss of this scarce and essential bird habitat. Scientists, conservation practitioners, and land managers are collaborating to restore key riparian areas to health, and to understand how bird responses to restoration efforts can indicate restoration success.

NEWS RELEASE: Migratory songbirds are not likely to show fidelity to molting sites

When playing at home, sports teams usually benefit from home-field advantage. A similar advantage exists among migratory birds that return to the same nesting site year after year to find familiar surroundings, food, and neighbors. The act of returning to the same site—site fidelity—has been documented in songbirds during nesting season for decades; however, what has remained a mystery is whether or not songbirds exhibit a similar site fidelity after the breeding season, during their annual molt, or replacement of feathers.

NEWS RELEASE: For Rufous Hummingbirds, migration looks different depending on age and sex

Plucky, beautiful and declining in numbers at about a 2% annual rate, the Rufous Hummingbird makes its long annual migration in different timing and route patterns based the birds’ age and sex, new research by Oregon State University shows. The findings, published in the journal Avian Conservation & Ecology, are important because the more that is known about how Rufous Hummingbirds migrate, the more that can be done to ensure birds of each age and sex category have the resources they need each year on their journey up and down the western part of North America.

NEWS RELEASE: Hummingbirds and Forest Fires — It’s Complicated

From a hummingbird’s point of view, wildfire can be good or bad. With support from the USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and WHP, Dr. Deborah M. Finch from the Research Station collaborated with Dr. Alexander and his research team at Klamath Bird Observatory in Oregon and with Dr. Sarahy Contreras from the University of Guadalajara – CUCSUR to complete a literature review about the effects of wildfire on hummingbird habitat, how restoration actions including prescribed fire affect those habitats, and how hummingbirds respond.

Giving Tuesday and the Southern Oregon Give Guide

For a second year, the Rogue Valley Messenger has included Klamath Bird Observatory in their annual Give Guide — a listing of local nonprofits, each of which is doing important work to make the world of southern Oregon a better place. The Give Guide includes basic information about 17 different groups that the Messenger is […]

3 BILLION BIRDS GONE: Together we can bring them back

Data show that since 1970, the U.S. and Canada have lost nearly 3 billion birds, a massive reduction in abundance involving hundreds of species, from beloved backyard songbirds to long-distance migrants. Learn more about what you can do at www.3BillionBirds.org Today our colleagues published a study in the journal Science revealing that since 1970, bird […]

Save the Date — Klamath Bird Observatory’s Wings and Wine Gala

SUNDAY September 22nd, 2019, 3:00 -7:00 PMGRIZZLY PEAK WINERY, ASHLAND, OREGON Online Registration Opens July 21st! Klamath Bird Observatory’s Wings and Wine Gala is back by popular demand. Come celebrate more than 20 years of KBO advancing bird and habitat conservation through science, education, and partnerships. Please help us continue our work by participating in […]

NEWS RELEASE: An improved method of assessing the value of habitats to wildlife: Incorporating behavior into measures of species diversity

NEWS RELEASE: March 23, 2019 CONTACT: John Alexander, Executive Director, Klamath Bird Observatory, 541‐890‐7067, jda@klamathbird.org Managers charged with stewarding public and private lands strive to protect, maintain, and restore healthy forest conditions that are resilient to drought, flood, and severe wildfire. Managers often rely on the presence of indicator species and species richness (i.e., the […]

NEWS RELEASE: Studying select songbirds paints a broader picture of overall ecosystem health

*** News Release: March 12, 2019*** Jaime Stephens, Science Director, Klamath Bird Observatory, 541-944-2890, jlh@klamathbird.org Ashland, OR – A new study on songbirds in the Pacific Northwest, released on March 11th, empirically tests the use of focal species as indicators of ecosystem health. Focal species are often monitored to understand overall ecosystem health and thereby […]

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