Tag: Birdwatching

BIRDING PUGET SOUND IN THE PACIFIC NW EXPEDITION IN MARCH!

March 4-8, 2019—with Harry Fuller (Birding guidebook author) and Shannon Rio (KBO Board President)

This birding trip will focus on wintering birds of the Puget Sound region that spend the summer in nesting territories further north. The group will visit many birding hotspots at some the most beautiful areas of the Pacific Northwest (maybe the world!).

Monday, March 4
Our birding begins at the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually Wildlife Refuge. From there we will proceed to Lacey to our motel and dinner. Glaucous-winged Gull, Varied Thrush, Common Merganser, Hooded Merganser, Northern Pintail, Bufflehead, Pileated Woodpecker, and both Golden-crowned and Ruby-crowned Kinglets are likely birds on this first day.

Tuesday, March 5
Proceed north on US 101 to bird along Hood Canal. Lunch at Hama Hama Oyster Saloon. We will make stops at various parks and overlooks along the canal which is actually a natural, narrow finger of ocean reaching down from the top of Puget Sound complex. Birds we should see include Red-breasted Merganser, Brant, Common and Barrow’s Goldeneye, Red-necked and Western Grebe, Common Loon, Bald Eagle, Pelagic Cormorant, Pigeon Guillemot, Long-tailed Duck, American Black Oystercatcher, Belted Kingfisher, various gulls. Dinner and overnight in Sequim for next two nights.

Wednesday, March 6
Birding on upper Olympic Peninsula including Ediz Hook in Port Angeles Harbor and Dungeness NWR in Sequim. Target birds for the day: flocks of Harlequin, floats of Rhino Auklets, Trumpeter Swans, Red-throated Loons, more Long-tailed Ducks, all three scoter species, Brandt’s Cormorant. Dinner at Sequim restaurant.

Thursday, March 7
We will take the ferry from Port Townsend north to Whidbey Island, thence north to Skagit Flats. Possible birds today include Rough-legged Hawk, Gyrfalcon, Short-eared Owl, Trumpeter Swan, Snow Goose, Peregrine Falcon, Merlin, all three cormorant species … and try for a Yellow-billed Loon which usually shows up along the route each winter. Overnight along I-5 north of Seattle at Marysville.

Friday, March 8
Depart for home.

COST: $782.00 per person—includes accommodations for sharing a double room, travel expenses (round-trip travel in large van), and expert birding tour guide for the 5 day, 4 night expedition. Breakfasts will be provided at the hotels we stay at—participants will responsible for other meals (lunch and dinner). Folks are encouraged to bring lunch type foods as we will eat outdoors while we are birding.

$200 of the cost is a tax deductible contribution to the Klamath Bird Observatory. Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or by calling 541-840-4655 if you are interested in signing up or if you have questions.

Register Now – a Few Spots Remain for Upcoming Talk and Walk Class

CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD
Presented by Karl Schneck, KBO board member

Talk: October 18th Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Karl’s life-long passion for birds has guided the landscaping on his property in the foothills just outside Ashland, Oregon. In this talk, he will present the many ways a backyard can be made more attractive and useful for birds in our region. He will also introduce the feathered neighbors that now live on or have visited his backyard and who will be likely seen during the field trip.

In Karl’s words …
“With 117 species in just over three years, I feel especially grateful for the abundance of birds seen on our property two miles north of I-5 on N. Valley View Road. which consists of several habitats, including riparian, oak woodland, and grasslands. I’ve had quite a few days when I’ve traveled to see the birds and came home wondering why I didn’t just stay at home and see more species (of course, there are benefits to seeing new areas). However, when I get too old to tromp through the forests and swamps, there is comfort in knowing that I can sit on my deck and enjoy a multitude of birds.

We are still in the process of planting and improving our yard habitat for the birds. Watching the hummers feed from our penstemons is one example of adding features for the birds, as well as feeders, water, and shelter. Adding features for specific birds can be rewarding when your target bird shows up. Across the road, Bald Eagles come in to feed on the afterbirth of the cows. This year I had Barn Owl, American Kestrel, Acorn Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Golden Eagle (about a mile away), Bullock’s Oriole, Brewer’s Blackbird, Western Kingbird, Oak Titmouse, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, California Towhee, and undoubtedly a number of others I didn’t know about, nesting on the property.

All these birds bring great joy to my life and make a great start to the day when I walk outside in the morning and take them all in. So, my goal for this class is to share my birds with you in a walk and a light lunch, hoping you will enjoy them as much as I do.”

Walk: October 20th Saturday 8:00am-12:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

This is a field trip to Karl’s property on the edge of Ashland—bring your binoculars! Lunch will be provided (included with registration fee) on Karl’s birdy patio where the birding adventure will continue.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Science Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

Talk and Walk Series: CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD

CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD
Presented by Karl Schneck, KBO board member

Talk: October 18th Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Karl’s life-long passion for birds has guided the landscaping on his property in the foothills just outside Ashland, Oregon. In this talk, he will present the many ways a backyard can be made more attractive and useful for birds in our region. He will also introduce the feathered neighbors that now live on or have visited his backyard and who will be likely seen during the field trip.

In Karl’s words …
“With 117 species in just over three years, I feel especially grateful for the abundance of birds seen on our property two miles north of I-5 on N. Valley View Road. which consists of several habitats, including riparian, oak woodland, and grasslands. I’ve had quite a few days when I’ve traveled to see the birds and came home wondering why I didn’t just stay at home and see more species (of course, there are benefits to seeing new areas). However, when I get too old to tromp through the forests and swamps, there is comfort in knowing that I can sit on my deck and enjoy a multitude of birds.

We are still in the process of planting and improving our yard habitat for the birds. Watching the hummers feed from our penstemons is one example of adding features for the birds, as well as feeders, water, and shelter. Adding features for specific birds can be rewarding when your target bird shows up. Across the road, Bald Eagles come in to feed on the afterbirth of the cows. This year I had Barn Owl, American Kestrel, Acorn Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Golden Eagle (about a mile away), Bullock’s Oriole, Brewer’s Blackbird, Western Kingbird, Oak Titmouse, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, California Towhee, and undoubtedly a number of others I didn’t know about, nesting on the property.

All these birds bring great joy to my life and make a great start to the day when I walk outside in the morning and take them all in. So, my goal for this class is to share my birds with you in a walk and a light lunch, hoping you will enjoy them as much as I do.”

Walk: October 20th Saturday 8:00am-12:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

This is a field trip to Karl’s property on the edge of Ashland—bring your binoculars! Lunch will be provided (included with registration fee) on Karl’s birdy patio where the birding adventure will continue.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Science Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

KBO at the Oregon Country Fair!

Klamath Bird Observatory will again join in the festivities at the Oregon Country Fair (OCF) this year. The uniquely-Oregon arts, crafts, music, and well-being fair takes place July 13-15.

KBO shares an information booth with the Master Gardeners in Community Village—look for the Yellow-breasted Chats! We will lead a morning Birds of the Fair walk and we are a joyful participant in the OCF StewardShip Program as a Passport Station. OCF’s StewardShip Program celebrates the Fair’s sustainability and philanthropy. Check out the full line up of workshops and performances at the Stewardship in Xavanadu and to participate in the OCF Scavenger Hunt. Stop by our booth to learn about the Birds of the Fair and get your StewardShip Passport Book stamped!

CLICK HERE to visit the OCF website for information about the fair’s circus, comedy, dance, poetry, and musical lineups, activities and workshops, food, and nearby lodging.

About the Oregon Country Fair (from OCF website):

The Oregon Country Fair (OCF) creates events and experiences that nourish the spirit, explore living artfully and authentically on earth, and transform culture in magical, joyous and healthy ways.

The OCF is an annual three-day festival offering the finest in entertainment, hand-made crafts, delectable food and information sharing. The Fair takes place in Veneta, Oregon, about 15 miles west of Eugene. The Fair takes place in a wooded setting with its own water and communication systems, security team, recycling service, and much, much more. We enjoy a mutually cooperative relationship with our neighbors and a solid niche in the Veneta community. Started in 1969 as a benefit for an alternative school, the OCF has a rich and varied history of alternative arts and performance promotion, educational opportunities, land stewardship and philanthropy.

Year of the Bird in May – It’s a Global Big Day!

It’s May in the Year of the Bird and our call to action is Global Big Day! Saturday May 5th is the day people all over the world will be watching birds and putting them on the world map via eBird.

What to do: Look for birds and report what you find at eBird.org in this exciting 24-hour quest to collectively record as many bird species as possible across the world.

How to do it: Watch birds on May 5th –any time from midnight to midnight in your local time zone. It’s that simple. You don’t need to be a bird expert, or go out all day long.
• Get an eBird account if you don’t already have one: eBird is a worldwide bird checklist program used by hundreds of thousands of birders. It’s what allows us to compile everyone’s sightings into a single massive Global Big Day list—while at the same time collecting the data for scientists to use to better understand birds. It’s free. Log your sightings on the eBird website or download the eBird app, for maximum ease-of-use.
• Watch the sightings roll in: During the day, keep an eye on how the lists are growing in different parts of the world. Follow along with sightings from more than 150 countries, including the Cornell Lab’s Team Sapsucker in Colombia, Honduras, and California. Stats will be updated in real-time on our Global Big Day page.

Pro Birder Tips for Big Day Success:
• Explore eBird Hotspots near you.
• Put your birding plans on the worldwide Global Big Day map.
• Get together with friends and set a goal for your birding—most unusual species? Biggest flock? All the species in your favorite family? The possibilities are endless.
• Take photos and add them to your checklist—they might end up on the Global Big Day page!

Why do it?
• Put your birds on the map! Your sightings become part of a global snapshot that helps track the numbers, health, and movements of birds for scientists and conservationists.
• It helps other birders: your data feeds migration forecasts, species checklists, and hotspot maps that are free for all.
• 20,000 bird watchers around the world will be on a 24-hour birding binge; count yourself in their ranks.
• In 2017, bird watchers recorded an incredible 65% of all the bird species on the planet. Can we set a new record?

CLICK HERE to learn more about Global Big Day and eBird.

And don’t miss World Migratory Bird Day! There are 1,200 events happening around the world in 200 cities on Saturday May 12, including two KBO is part of—Rogue Valley Bird Day and the Global Migratory Bird Day Birdwatching Field Trip in Shasta Valley Wildlife Area.

CLICK HERE to view the Rogue Valley Bird Day 2018 flyer.

CLICK HERE to view the Shasta Valley Birdwatching Field Trip 2018 flyer.

Of course the invaluable citizen science wonder that is eBird is bigger than Global Big Day—watch the birds any day and let your observations add to our body of knowledge, empowering bird conservation science through eBird. Every bird counts so count all your birds!

MALHEUR IN JUNE BIRDING EXPEDITION—led by Harry Fuller

Announcing our always popular Malheur birding trip scheduled for June 2nd-5th, 2018!

This five-day and four-night eastern Oregon birding expedition will begin with birding from Ashland to Summer Lake, explore surrounding wildlife areas, and stay at the Summer Lake Lodge. On the second day we will arrive at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge—birding this special area the next three days with accommodations at Crystal Crane Hot Springs those three nights. Bring your swim suit as we will study the night sky from the warmth of the hot spring pool in the evenings (optional of course). One night we will have dinner at the famous Diamond Hotel. Dinners will include tallies of our birds for the day.

Some of the species we hope to see: Cinnamon Teal, Trumpeter Swan, White-faced Ibis, Sandhill Crane, Ferruginous and Swainson’s hawks, Bald and Golden eagles, nesting Long-billed Curlew, Wilson’s Phalarope and Wilson’s Snipe, Franklin’s Gull, Black Tern, Prairie Falcon, Great Horned and Barn owls, Common Nighthawk, Loggerhead Shrike, Eastern Kingbird, Gray Flycatcher, Say’s Phoebe, Black-billed Magpie, Rock and Canyon wrens, Sage Thrasher, Mountain Bluebird, Sagebrush and Brewer’s sparrows, and Yellow-headed Blackbird. We have seen as many as 142 species on this trip in the past.

Cost of the trip is $575 which includes modest accommodations, dinners, transportation (a small van will be available plus there will be room in vehicles), and the expert guiding of birding extraordinaire and bird guidebook author Harry Fuller. $300 of this will be a tax deductible contribution to the Klamath Bird Observatory so not only will you have a fantastic adventure in a very special part of the world, you’ll contribute to bird and habitat conservation efforts.

Participants will need to bring breakfast and lunches. Sign up by contacting Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call her at 541-840-4655.

A New Citizen Science Opportunity

Klamath Bird Observatory and The Selberg Institute recently completed a successful year-long citizen science project on the beautiful Sampson Creek Preserve just east of Ashland. This work would not have been completed without a group of dedicated citizen scientists who spent many mornings birding the property. During the year 119 species were detected on 105 eBird checklists, with Acorn Woodpecker being the most detected species. Though this project is coming to a close we are excited to announce a new citizen science project on the Grizzly Peak Preserve.

This project offers something for all birders and outdoor enthusiasts. Participants will have the choice to bird on fairly flat terrain walking less than two miles through meadows and oak trees or for more adventurous birders to explore off-trail along a gradient of different habitats. The project will take place on a large parcel of private property along the slopes of Grizzly Peak, with survey locations starting just minutes outside of the city of Ashland boundary and continuing up Shale City road. The Preserve is in the foothills of the Cascades and holds a variety of oak habitats as well as coniferous forests and riparian woodlands. The Preserve is a terrific spot for birding and will give the public a unique opportunity to visit and bird in diverse habitats managed for conservation.

Citizen Scientists will be trained on a simple protocol to learn how to collect data, and the opportunity for monthly surveys will continue throughout the year. If you enjoy looking for owls, you are in luck as well. This project will also include two guided night surveys to inventory the local owl population. Participation in surveys will include some walking and/or hiking, recording all birds observed by sight and/or sound, and entering and submitting your findings into eBird Northwest. With this project we aim to complete a robust inventory for the bird species on the Grizzly Peak Preserve by harnessing the power of Citizen Scientists to collect robust data throughout the breeding, migratory, and winter seasons.

As spring migration is underway surveys are starting at the Grizzly Peak Preserve, if you are interested in participating or would like more information please contact KBO Biologist Ellie Armstrong at eea@klamathbird.org.

2018 is the Year of the Bird!

The National Geographic Society, in partnership with National Audubon Society, Birdlife International, and The Cornell Lab of Ornithology have proclaimed 2018 as the Year of the Bird. The Year of the Bird marks 100 years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act—the most powerful and important bird-protection law ever passed. The Year of the Bird will celebrate the wonder of our feathered friends and provide an opportunity for people everywhere to recommit themselves to protecting birds. The Year of the Bird will be 12 months of storytelling, science, and conservation aimed at heightening public awareness of birds and the importance of protecting them.

KBO, many other organizations, and people all around the world are committing to help protect birds today and for the next hundred years. Everyone can join in and be a part of the #YearoftheBird! National Geographic will be highlighting simple actions you can take part in each month to make a difference for birds—visit their website (see link below) to read more about this special year. Another wonderful resource is the All About Birds website’s “6 Resolutions To Help You #BirdYourWorld In 2018” (see link below). KBO will post news and updates of these actions and how to stay involved throughout the year through our Call Note blog and at eBird Northwest.

As Thomas Lovejoy, biologist and “godfather of biodiversity” once stated: “If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the environmental problems in the world.”

CLICK HERE to visit National Geographic Society’s website Year of the Bird page.
CLICK HERE to visit The Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s website “6 Resolutions to Help You #BirdYourWorld in 2018” article.

 

BIRDING THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST with Harry Fuller and Shannon Rio March 2—6, 2018

This birding adventure will focus on wintering birds of the Pacific Northwest that spend the summer in nesting territories further north. 

We will bird in and around Puget Sound, including Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, then travel along the Hood Canal and north to the upper tip of the Olympic Peninsula. A ferry will take us from Port Townsend to Whidbey Island. Plan to see Trumpeter Swan, Harlequin and Long-tailed ducks, Rhinoceros Auklet, Pacific Loon, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Brant, Black and White-Winged scoters, Northern Shrike, Short-eared Owl, Rough-legged Hawk, and many others. Some of the Pacific Northwest’s most beautiful landscapes will be the backdrop for fantastic birding. We may also get to see an orca pod on the ferry!

Costs: Early-bird fee is $569 per person if paid by January 1, 2018. The fee includes four nights’ hotel accommodation and travel to and from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SeaTac – airport code SEA). Also included is the expertise of master bird guide Harry Fuller. The group will travel by van and ferry during the adventure. $300 of the fee is a tax deductible donation to the Klamath Bird Observatory. After January 1, 2018 cost of the trip is $619 so sign up early as it will make plane flights cheaper and easier to obtain. Reasonably-priced early-morning flights from Medford (MFR), Eugene (EUG), or San Francisco (SFO) to SeaTac are available on a few major airlines (Alaska, Delta, and American—and Southwest Airlines out of Oakland (OAK)).

Participants pay for their meals and travel to and from SeaTac airport where the trip begins and ends. Due to logistics and to maximize everyone’s adventure experience the group will be limited to 10 participants. Arrangements have been made for double-occupancy rooms in the towns of Lacey, Sequim (2 nights), and Burlington, WA where we will be stopping overnights.

To sign up for or more information about this sure-to-be-memorable birding adventure, contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or by phone (541) 840-4655. You will have the double pleasure of taking a special birding trip along with contributing to conservation as you support KBO.

 

***Please note—after January 1, 2018 cost of this trip will be non-refundable. Shannon Rio will help with coordinating arrival times as we gather in Seattle and any other details.

NEW TALK & WALK: RAPTORS OF THE KLAMATH BASIN!

TALK: February 2nd, Friday 6:30pm—8:30pm

WALK: February 3rd, Saturday or February 10, Saturday

Early February is a perfect time of year to enjoy raptor viewing in the picturesque Klamath Basin! Please join longtime KBO board member Dick Ashford, who will share his enthusiasm and knowledge during an informative Hawk ID classroom session on the evening of Feb 2nd. Then, enjoy a fun, day-long hawk watching outing to the Klamath Basin. In order to optimize your experience, half the class will be in the field on Feb 3rd, the other half on Feb 10th. The classroom session will be limited to 30 people and each of the two field trips to 15. This will allow us to carpool (a must!) in four vehicles.

Because this workshop is so popular, participants should enroll in the class as well as one of the field sessions. No “outing-only” signups, please. Please indicate what day you would like for your field trip, and we’ll look forward to seeing you in the Field Of Wonder!

To sign up or obtain more information, contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or 541-840-4655. The $30 cost includes the talk, outing and a classy handout on raptor identification.

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Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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