Tag: Community Education

The Great Fall Migration Melodrama is Upon Us!

Golden-crowned, White-crowned, and Fox Sparrows arriving en mass from the north! Hermit Warblers and many other local nesting birds departing for their Tropical winter homes! And Sharp-shinned Hawks chasing them all through the forests! What a sensational dramatic story unfolding at our bird banding stations in these early days of the great annual bird fall migration! And you are invited to bear witness from a catbird seat with KBO’s biologists.

Klamath Bird Observatory continues to offer public visits to bird banding at our Upper Klamath Field Station near Fort Klamath in the Upper Klamath Lake area—but there are just a few more opportunities this fall. The banding station is scheduled on most Thursday mornings through mid-October. Individual, family, and group visits can be arranged by emailing KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey (see below).

This banding station, along Sevenmile Creek on the Fremont-Winema National Forest, is one of the longest running bird monitoring sites in the region. In the fall, many songbird species migrate through the Klamath Basin and can be encountered here, especially large numbers of warblers and sparrows. The location is also a birding hotspot on the Klamath Basin Birding Trail.

And a reminder … Crater Lake National Park and KBO continue our bird ecology program series into the fall. These Park Ranger-led programs begin at the Park’s Steel Visitor Center and feature a visit to KBO’s banding station in nearby Munson Valley. These programs are scheduled on Friday mornings—please check the Crater Lake National Park series flyer below for upcoming dates and more details.

Don’t miss these opportunities to experience the grand drama and visit KBO’s biologists and the birds they are studying up close!

CLICK HERE to contact KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey to arrange a visit to KBO’s Sevenmile Creek banding station.

CLICK HERE to view the Klamath Basin Birding Trail website for birding hotspot descriptions, maps, and other local birding resources.

Don’t Miss the Opportunity to Visit a KBO Bird Banding Station in 2019!

Klamath Bird Observatory continues to offer public visits to bird banding at our Upper Klamath Field Station near Fort Klamath in the Upper Klamath Lake area. The bird banding is scheduled on Thursday mornings through mid-October. Individual, family, and group visits can be arranged by emailing KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey (see below).

Nestled along Sevenmile Creek on the Fremont-Winema National Forest, this banding station has been operated each year during the nesting and fall migration seasons since 1997—one of the longest running bird monitoring sites in the region. In the fall, many songbird species migrate through the Klamath Basin and can be encountered here, especially large numbers of warblers and sparrows. The location is also a birding hotspot on the Klamath Basin Birding Trail.

And … KBO and Crater Lake National Park continue our bird ecology program series into the fall. These Ranger-led programs begin at the Park’s Steel Visitor Center and feature a visit to KBO’s banding station at the Park’s Munson Valley. These programs are scheduled on Friday mornings—please check the Crater Lake National Park series flyer below for upcoming dates and more details.

Don’t miss these opportunities to visit KBO’s biologists and the birds they are studying up close!

CLICK HERE to contact KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey to arrange a visit to KBO’s Sevenmile Creek banding station.

CLICK HERE to view the Klamath Basin Birding Trail website for birding hotspot descriptions, maps, and other local birding resources.

Visit a KBO Banding Station in 2019!

Klamath Bird Observatory is offering public visits to our bird banding station near Fort Klamath in the Upper Klamath Lake area. The banding station is scheduled on most Thursday mornings through mid-October. Individual, family, and group visits can be arranged by emailing KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey (see below).

Situated along Sevenmile Creek within Fremont-Winema National Forest, this banding station has been operated each year during the nesting and fall migration seasons since 1997—one of the longest running bird monitoring sites in the region. In the fall, many songbird species migrate through the Klamath Basin and can be encountered here. The location is also a birding hotspot on the Klamath Basin Birding Trail.

Also, KBO and Crater Lake National Park continue our bird ecology program series into the fall. These Ranger-led programs begin at the Park’s Steel Visitor Center and feature a visit to KBO’s banding station within Crater Lake National Park. These programs are scheduled on Thursday or Friday mornings—please check the Crater Lake National Park series flyer below for upcoming dates and more details.

Don’t miss these opportunities to visit KBO’s biologists and the birds they are studying up close!

CLICK HERE to contact KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey to arrange a visit to KBO’s Sevenmile Creek banding station.

CLICK HERE to view the Klamath Basin Birding Trail website for birding hotspot descriptions, maps, and other local birding resources.

KBO at Klamath Falls World Migratory Bird Day Saturday May 18!

Come join us at the 20th Annual Klamath Falls World Migratory Bird Day Celebration at Veteran’s Park this Saturday May 18th! Several expert led birdwatching walks through the park will visit KBO’s bird banding demonstration throughout the festival. Biologists will share the captured wild birds up close before their release—a close-up experience of bird migration passing through the Klamath Basin.

CLICK HERE for more information about Klamath Falls World Migratory Bird Day.

The 2019 World Migratory Bird Day theme is “Protect Birds: Be the Solution to Plastic Pollution! Come and learn about bird migration and the problems they face from our plastic pollution. Each year, the World Migratory Bird Day advisory committee selects an artist to illustrate the annual conservation theme. Arnaldo Toledo Sotolongo, from Santa Clara, Cuba was selected to create the World Migratory Bird Day 2019 artwork—in which he displays a passionate and beautiful, though painfully tragic, poster illustration.

CLICK HERE to view the 2019 World Migratory Bird Day poster “Protect Birds: Be the Solution to Plastics Pollution”.

This local celebration of World Migratory Bird Day is sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in partnership with Klamath Watershed Partnership, Klamath Basin Audubon Society, Klamath Wing Watchers, U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, the City of Klamath Falls, and many other valuable partners. Now in its 29th year, World Migratory Bird Day has grown from a one-day event into a framework underpinning hundreds of projects and programs year-round. It is coordinated by Environment for the Americas, which provides bilingual educational materials and information about birds and bird conservation throughout the Americas. Their programs inspire children and adults to get outdoors, learn about birds, and take part in their conservation.

CLICH HERE for more information about World Migratory Bird Day and Environment of the Americas.

KBO at Rogue Valley Bird Day Festival – Next Saturday May 11!

Spring is here and so are the birds at the Rogue Valley Bird Day festival at Ashland’s North Mountain Park! Join Klamath Bird Observatory biologists at a bird banding demonstration—one of the many family friendly activities planned. The City of Ashland Department of Parks and Recreation with many partners will host the Rogue Valley Bird Day festival Saturday May 11 from 8 am to 12 pm. The festival is our local celebration of World Migratory Bird Day and will feature expert-guided bird walks, The Big Sit feeder watch, thrilling programs featuring birds of prey by Wildlife Images Education Rehabilitation Center, our bird banding demonstration, and the ever-very-popular bird calling contest!

KBO will also present an interactive display and demonstration of eBird tools that help link community birders with conservation science. The display will highlight Community Science tools that allow all birders to contribute to local and international monitoring efforts and existing bird data from Bear Creek and North Mountain Park, which has undergone immense restoration over the past 20 years.

CLICK HERE for more information about Rogue Valley Bird Day.

The 2019 World Migratory Bird Day theme is “Protect Birds: Be the Solution to Plastic Pollution! Come and learn about the problems birds face from our world-wide plastic problem. And experience the bird migration right here in our beautiful Rogue Valley! Several walks through the park led by area birding experts will visit KBO’s bird banding demonstration. Biologists will share the captured wild birds up close before their release.

Each year, the World Migratory Bird Day advisory committee selects an artist to illustrate the annual conservation theme. Arnaldo Toledo Sotolongo, from Santa Clara, Cuba was selected to create the World Migratory Bird Day 2019 artwork. Arnaldo is a scientific illustrator, photographer and designer, and volunteers in conservation projects in his free time. His 2019 poster illustration tells a passionate though painfully tragic tale.

CLICK HERE to view the 2019 World Migratory Bird Day poster “Protect Birds: Be the Solution to Plastics Pollution”.

Now in its 29th year, World Migratory Bird Day has grown from a one-day event into a framework underpinning hundreds of projects and programs year-round. It is coordinated by Environment for the Americas, which provides multi-lingual educational materials and information about birds and bird conservation throughout the Americas. Their programs inspire children and adults to get outdoors, learn about birds, and take part in their conservation.

CLICK HERE for more information about World Migratory Bird Day and Environment of the Americas.

CLICK HERE to learn more about plastic pollution and how it is affecting birds.

 

BIRDING PUGET SOUND IN THE PACIFIC NW EXPEDITION IN MARCH!

March 4-8, 2019—with Harry Fuller (Birding guidebook author) and Shannon Rio (KBO Board President)

This birding trip will focus on wintering birds of the Puget Sound region that spend the summer in nesting territories further north. The group will visit many birding hotspots at some the most beautiful areas of the Pacific Northwest (maybe the world!).

Monday, March 4
Our birding begins at the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually Wildlife Refuge. From there we will proceed to Lacey to our motel and dinner. Glaucous-winged Gull, Varied Thrush, Common Merganser, Hooded Merganser, Northern Pintail, Bufflehead, Pileated Woodpecker, and both Golden-crowned and Ruby-crowned Kinglets are likely birds on this first day.

Tuesday, March 5
Proceed north on US 101 to bird along Hood Canal. Lunch at Hama Hama Oyster Saloon. We will make stops at various parks and overlooks along the canal which is actually a natural, narrow finger of ocean reaching down from the top of Puget Sound complex. Birds we should see include Red-breasted Merganser, Brant, Common and Barrow’s Goldeneye, Red-necked and Western Grebe, Common Loon, Bald Eagle, Pelagic Cormorant, Pigeon Guillemot, Long-tailed Duck, American Black Oystercatcher, Belted Kingfisher, various gulls. Dinner and overnight in Sequim for next two nights.

Wednesday, March 6
Birding on upper Olympic Peninsula including Ediz Hook in Port Angeles Harbor and Dungeness NWR in Sequim. Target birds for the day: flocks of Harlequin, floats of Rhino Auklets, Trumpeter Swans, Red-throated Loons, more Long-tailed Ducks, all three scoter species, Brandt’s Cormorant. Dinner at Sequim restaurant.

Thursday, March 7
We will take the ferry from Port Townsend north to Whidbey Island, thence north to Skagit Flats. Possible birds today include Rough-legged Hawk, Gyrfalcon, Short-eared Owl, Trumpeter Swan, Snow Goose, Peregrine Falcon, Merlin, all three cormorant species … and try for a Yellow-billed Loon which usually shows up along the route each winter. Overnight along I-5 north of Seattle at Marysville.

Friday, March 8
Depart for home.

COST: $782.00 per person—includes accommodations for sharing a double room, travel expenses (round-trip travel in large van), and expert birding tour guide for the 5 day, 4 night expedition. Breakfasts will be provided at the hotels we stay at—participants will responsible for other meals (lunch and dinner). Folks are encouraged to bring lunch type foods as we will eat outdoors while we are birding.

$200 of the cost is a tax deductible contribution to the Klamath Bird Observatory. Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or by calling 541-840-4655 if you are interested in signing up or if you have questions.

Upcoming Talk and Walk Class: Nature Photography

A SEASONAL JOURNEY THROUGH THE KLAMATH BASIN AND BASIC NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

TALK: December 9th, 2018 Sunday 5:00-6:30pm

Join Mel Clements as he presents 4 short DVD’s (photography and music) that highlights the birds and landscape of the Klamath Basin Wildlife Refuge through the four seasons of the year. A fifth DVD will feature the powerful beauty of the Great Gray Owl. Guidelines for photographing birds and other wildlife will be presented along with the ethics of bird photography. Mel will discuss how to get the best photos and disturb the birds the least. Shannon Rio will co-host the event and discuss the field trip to the Klamath Basin area.

This talk will take place in a local home and wine, bubbly water, and light snacks will be available.

WALK: OUTING TO TULE LAKE AND KLAMATH REFUGES

Two separate dates will be set aside, one in January and one in February to go to the Klamath Basin. This trip includes a three hour tour from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist. The guided trip starts at the Tule Lake Refuge Headquarters. The rest of the day will be exploring the Refuges auto route looking for birds and photo opportunities.

COST: $50 will cover the talk and the outing. To sign up, contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call her at 541-840-4655.

Talk and Walk Series: CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD

CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD
Presented by Karl Schneck, KBO board member

Talk: October 18th Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Karl’s life-long passion for birds has guided the landscaping on his property in the foothills just outside Ashland, Oregon. In this talk, he will present the many ways a backyard can be made more attractive and useful for birds in our region. He will also introduce the feathered neighbors that now live on or have visited his backyard and who will be likely seen during the field trip.

In Karl’s words …
“With 117 species in just over three years, I feel especially grateful for the abundance of birds seen on our property two miles north of I-5 on N. Valley View Road. which consists of several habitats, including riparian, oak woodland, and grasslands. I’ve had quite a few days when I’ve traveled to see the birds and came home wondering why I didn’t just stay at home and see more species (of course, there are benefits to seeing new areas). However, when I get too old to tromp through the forests and swamps, there is comfort in knowing that I can sit on my deck and enjoy a multitude of birds.

We are still in the process of planting and improving our yard habitat for the birds. Watching the hummers feed from our penstemons is one example of adding features for the birds, as well as feeders, water, and shelter. Adding features for specific birds can be rewarding when your target bird shows up. Across the road, Bald Eagles come in to feed on the afterbirth of the cows. This year I had Barn Owl, American Kestrel, Acorn Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Golden Eagle (about a mile away), Bullock’s Oriole, Brewer’s Blackbird, Western Kingbird, Oak Titmouse, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, California Towhee, and undoubtedly a number of others I didn’t know about, nesting on the property.

All these birds bring great joy to my life and make a great start to the day when I walk outside in the morning and take them all in. So, my goal for this class is to share my birds with you in a walk and a light lunch, hoping you will enjoy them as much as I do.”

Walk: October 20th Saturday 8:00am-12:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

This is a field trip to Karl’s property on the edge of Ashland—bring your binoculars! Lunch will be provided (included with registration fee) on Karl’s birdy patio where the birding adventure will continue.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Science Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

Birding the Klamath Basin’s National Wildlife Refuges

October 11, Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at Ashland Outdoor Store

Presented by Shannon Rio, President of the Board of Klamath Bird Observatory

The stunning photography and dramatic history of the Birding the Klamath Basin’s National Wildlife Refuges presentation will take us to some of the most amazing wildlife refuges—all within the Klamath Basin right here in our southern Oregon and northern California backyard. One of these, the Lower Klamath, was the nation’s first National Wildlife Refuge, established by President Teddy Roosevelt in 1908 specifically for protection of migratory birds. The Klamath Basin refuges are recognized far and wide for sweeping vistas and spectacular birding.

This presentation is an invitation to visit the Refuges with public access and will include information on how to find them and what glory you might expect to see there. We will also discuss the Federal Duck Stamp’s role in protecting lands for wildlife and encourage the purchase of these stamps that support the Refuge. KBO Executive Director John Alexander will speak briefly on conservation, our wildlife refuges, and how we as individuals can make a difference on their behalf.

This presentation is free. The Outdoor Store is located at 37 North 3rd Street in Ashland, Oregon.

Shannon Rio is a wildlife educator who believes that when we connect with nature, we will naturally want to protect what we love: the birds and wild places.

Klamath Bird Observatory advances bird and habitat conservation through science, education, and partnerships.

Contact

Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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