Tag: Community Education

Talk and Walk Series: CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD

CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD
Presented by Karl Schneck, KBO board member

Talk: October 18th Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Karl’s life-long passion for birds has guided the landscaping on his property in the foothills just outside Ashland, Oregon. In this talk, he will present the many ways a backyard can be made more attractive and useful for birds in our region. He will also introduce the feathered neighbors that now live on or have visited his backyard and who will be likely seen during the field trip.

In Karl’s words …
“With 117 species in just over three years, I feel especially grateful for the abundance of birds seen on our property two miles north of I-5 on N. Valley View Road. which consists of several habitats, including riparian, oak woodland, and grasslands. I’ve had quite a few days when I’ve traveled to see the birds and came home wondering why I didn’t just stay at home and see more species (of course, there are benefits to seeing new areas). However, when I get too old to tromp through the forests and swamps, there is comfort in knowing that I can sit on my deck and enjoy a multitude of birds.

We are still in the process of planting and improving our yard habitat for the birds. Watching the hummers feed from our penstemons is one example of adding features for the birds, as well as feeders, water, and shelter. Adding features for specific birds can be rewarding when your target bird shows up. Across the road, Bald Eagles come in to feed on the afterbirth of the cows. This year I had Barn Owl, American Kestrel, Acorn Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Golden Eagle (about a mile away), Bullock’s Oriole, Brewer’s Blackbird, Western Kingbird, Oak Titmouse, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, California Towhee, and undoubtedly a number of others I didn’t know about, nesting on the property.

All these birds bring great joy to my life and make a great start to the day when I walk outside in the morning and take them all in. So, my goal for this class is to share my birds with you in a walk and a light lunch, hoping you will enjoy them as much as I do.”

Walk: October 20th Saturday 8:00am-12:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

This is a field trip to Karl’s property on the edge of Ashland—bring your binoculars! Lunch will be provided (included with registration fee) on Karl’s birdy patio where the birding adventure will continue.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Science Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

Birding the Klamath Basin’s National Wildlife Refuges

October 11, Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at Ashland Outdoor Store

Presented by Shannon Rio, President of the Board of Klamath Bird Observatory

The stunning photography and dramatic history of the Birding the Klamath Basin’s National Wildlife Refuges presentation will take us to some of the most amazing wildlife refuges—all within the Klamath Basin right here in our southern Oregon and northern California backyard. One of these, the Lower Klamath, was the nation’s first National Wildlife Refuge, established by President Teddy Roosevelt in 1908 specifically for protection of migratory birds. The Klamath Basin refuges are recognized far and wide for sweeping vistas and spectacular birding.

This presentation is an invitation to visit the Refuges with public access and will include information on how to find them and what glory you might expect to see there. We will also discuss the Federal Duck Stamp’s role in protecting lands for wildlife and encourage the purchase of these stamps that support the Refuge. KBO Executive Director John Alexander will speak briefly on conservation, our wildlife refuges, and how we as individuals can make a difference on their behalf.

This presentation is free. The Outdoor Store is located at 37 North 3rd Street in Ashland, Oregon.

Shannon Rio is a wildlife educator who believes that when we connect with nature, we will naturally want to protect what we love: the birds and wild places.

Klamath Bird Observatory advances bird and habitat conservation through science, education, and partnerships.

Registration Still Open for Great Gray Owl Talk and Walk

FINDING AND PHOTOGRAPHING THE GREAT GRAY OWL OF THE CASCADES
Presented by Mel Clements

Talk: September 28th Friday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Great Gray Owl photographer Mel Clements will speak on his experience of photographing the Great Gray Owls of the Cascades. The presentation includes an introduction to the Great Gray Owl, its habitat, and the ethics of finding and photographing this magnificent, yet reclusive owl. His talk is accompanied by 43 of his photographs, a five minute dvd set to music, and small exhibit of framed photographs.

Walk: September 29th Saturday 6:30am-1:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

We will leave early so that we can arrive in the Cascade Lakes area at sunrise. Pack a lunch and dress warmly. Morning temperatures are around 37 degrees. Participants will car pool. Don’t forget to bring your binoculars! More information about the field trip will be given out during the Friday evening presentation.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

It’s September in the Year of the Bird!

Our Call to Action this September in the Year of the Bird is to do everything we can to help birds have a safe migration this fall. Each year, billions of birds migrate north in the spring and south in the fall. Along the way, though, they now face all sorts of human-made challenges. Whether it be from vast expanses of concrete to invisible windows and confusing artificial lights, the number of migrating birds that die every year is estimated to be as many as 1 billion.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Making windows bird-safe, turning off your lights, planting native plants, encouraging bird-friendly architecture in your community—these are all ways you can help birds have a safer migration. So for September, our Year of the Bird ask is to do everything you can to help birds have a safe migration this fall. You can read more about how to do this and how lights and windows pose dangers to migrating birds in the featured Year of the Bird post and KBO info handouts below.

CLICK HERE to visit the National Audubon Society’s September’s Featured Action: Help Birds Have a Safe Migration post.

And check out KBO’s info handouts: Reducing Bird Collisions with Windows, Birdify Your Yard, and Cats and Wildlife—available at our website (see link below).

CLICK HERE to view KBO’s Reducing Bird Collisions with Windows info handout.

CLICK HERE to view KBO’s Birdify Your Yard info handout.

CLICK HERE to view KBO’s Cats and Wildlife info handout.

 

2018 is Year of the Bird! The National Geographic Society is celebrating the centenary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act with a year-long celebration of birds. Dozens of Year of the Bird partners, including Klamath Bird Observatory, are coordinating Year of the Bird activities.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the Year of the Bird at the National Geographic Society’s website.

Just a Few Spots Remaining for The Art of Bird Photography Class this Wednesday!

September 19, Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm at 320 Beach Street in Ashland

Presented by Karl Schneck, nature photographer and KBO board member

Birding and photography have been Karl Schneck’s passions for over 50 years, so it’s a perfect combination for him to photograph birds. Not that long ago, it was difficult to get decent bird photos because many birds are small, move quickly, often in dim light, and difficult to approach. Modern digital photographic equipment has made the task much easier if the basic principles are understood. Along with reviewing different types of equipment for digital bird photography, Karl will go over techniques for getting the pictures and then post-processing them to improve them as your tastes dictate.

His photography is about the birds and first requires the planning of the conditions, such as the light source and direction, wind, and background/foreground. The next step is setting the camera according to the environment and the desired outcome. And finally, the finishing touches with post-processing (Photoshop and others). The goal of the class is to present the options for bird photography and the ways to accomplish your requirements.

Registration for this special class is $20.00 with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs. Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

Banding Station Visit Opportunities Continue This Fall

Klamath Bird Observatory is offering public visits to our bird banding station near Fort Klamath in the Upper Klamath Lake area. The banding station is scheduled on Monday mornings through October 8. Individual, family, and group visits can be arranged by emailing KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey (see below).

Situated along Sevenmile Creek within Fremont-Winema National Forest, this banding station has been operated each year during the nesting and fall migration seasons since 1997—one of the longest running bird monitoring sites in the region. In the fall, many songbird species migrate through the Klamath Basin and can be encountered here. The location is also a birding hotspot on the Klamath Basin Birding Trail.

Also, KBO and Crater Lake National Park continue our bird ecology program series into the fall. These Ranger-led programs begin at the Park’s Steel Visitor Center and feature a visit to KBO’s banding station within Crater Lake National Park. The programs are scheduled on Thursday mornings—please check the Crater Lake National Park series flyer (see below) for upcoming dates and more details.

Don’t miss these opportunities to visit KBO’s biologists in the field and see the birds they are studying up close!

CLICK HERE to contact KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey to arrange a visit to KBO’s Sevenmile Creek banding station.

CLICK HERE to view the Crater Lake National Park bird banding visit flyer with more information and how to register.

CLICK HERE to view the Klamath Basin Birding Trail website for birding hotspot descriptions, maps, and other local birding resources.

KBO TALK AND WALK CLASSES THIS FALL

FINDING AND PHOTOGRAPHING THE GREAT GRAY OWL OF THE CASCADES
Presented by Mel Clements

Talk: September 28th Friday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Great Gray Owl photographer Mel Clements will speak on his experience of photographing the Great Gray Owls of the Cascades. The presentation includes an introduction to the Great Gray Owl, its habitat, and the ethics of finding and photographing this magnificent, yet reclusive owl. His talk is accompanied by 43 of his photographs, a five minute dvd set to music, and small exhibit of framed photographs.

Walk: September 29th Saturday 6:30am-1:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

We will leave early so that we can arrive in the Cascade Lakes area at sunrise. Pack a lunch and dress warmly. Morning temperatures are around 37 degrees. Participants will car pool. Don’t forget to bring your binoculars! More information about the field trip will be given out during the Friday evening presentation.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

 

CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD
Presented by Karl Schneck, KBO board member

Talk: October 18th Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Karl’s life-long passion for birds has guided the landscaping on his property in the foothills just outside Ashland, Oregon. In this talk, he will present the many ways a backyard can be made more attractive and useful for birds in our region. He will also introduce the feathered neighbors that now live on or have visited his backyard and who will be likely seen during the field trip.

In Karl’s words …
“With 117 species in just over three years, I feel especially grateful for the abundance of birds seen on our property two miles north of I-5 on N. Valley View Road. which consists of several habitats, including riparian, oak woodland, and grasslands. I’ve had quite a few days when I’ve traveled to see the birds and came home wondering why I didn’t just stay at home and see more species (of course, there are benefits to seeing new areas). However, when I get too old to tromp through the forests and swamps, there is comfort in knowing that I can sit on my deck and enjoy a multitude of birds.

We are still in the process of planting and improving our yard habitat for the birds. Watching the hummers feed from our penstemons is one example of adding features for the birds, as well as feeders, water, and shelter. Adding features for specific birds can be rewarding when your target bird shows up. Across the road, Bald Eagles come in to feed on the afterbirth of the cows. This year I had Barn Owl, American Kestrel, Acorn Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Golden Eagle (about a mile away), Bullock’s Oriole, Brewer’s Blackbird, Western Kingbird, Oak Titmouse, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, California Towhee, and undoubtedly a number of others I didn’t know about, nesting on the property.

All these birds bring great joy to my life and make a great start to the day when I walk outside in the morning and take them all in. So, my goal for this class is to share my birds with you in a walk and a light lunch, hoping you will enjoy them as much as I do.”

Walk: October 20th Saturday 8:00am-12:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

This is a field trip to Karl’s property on the edge of Ashland—bring your binoculars! Lunch will be provided (included with registration fee) on Karl’s birdy patio where the birding adventure will continue.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

 

And previously announced:

THE ART OF BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

September 19, Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm at 320 Beach Street in Ashland

Presented by Karl Schneck, nature photographer and KBO board member

Birding and photography have been Karl’s passions for over 50 years, so it’s a perfect combination for him to photograph birds. Not that long ago, it was difficult to get decent bird photos because many birds are small, move quickly, often in dim light, and difficult to approach. Modern digital photographic equipment has made the task much easier if the basic principles are understood. Along with reviewing different types of equipment for digital bird photography, Karl will go over techniques for getting the pictures and then post-processing to improve them as your tastes dictate.

His photography is about the birds and first requires the planning of the conditions, such as the light source and direction, wind, and background/foreground. The next step is setting the camera according to the environment and the desired outcome. And finally, the finishing touches with post-processing (Photoshop and others). The goal of the class is to present the options for bird photography and the ways to accomplish your requirements.

Registration for this special class is $20.00 with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

UPCOMING CLASS: THE ART OF BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

September 19, Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm at 320 Beach Street in Ashland

Presented by Karl Schneck, nature photographer and KBO board member

Birding and photography have been Karl Schneck’s passions for over 50 years, so it’s a perfect combination for him to photograph birds. Not that long ago, it was difficult to get decent bird photos because many birds are small, move quickly, often in dim light, and difficult to approach. Modern digital photographic equipment has made the task much easier if the basic principles are understood. Along with reviewing different types of equipment for digital bird photography, Karl will go over techniques for getting the pictures and then post-processing them to improve them as your tastes dictate.

His photography is about the birds and first requires the planning of the conditions, such as the light source and direction, wind, and background/foreground. The next step is setting the camera according to the environment and the desired outcome. And finally, the finishing touches with post-processing (Photoshop and others). The goal of the class is to present the options for bird photography and the ways to accomplish your requirements.

Registration for this special class is $20.00 with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs. Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

KBO at the Oregon Country Fair!

Klamath Bird Observatory will again join in the festivities at the Oregon Country Fair (OCF) this year. The uniquely-Oregon arts, crafts, music, and well-being fair takes place July 13-15.

KBO shares an information booth with the Master Gardeners in Community Village—look for the Yellow-breasted Chats! We will lead a morning Birds of the Fair walk and we are a joyful participant in the OCF StewardShip Program as a Passport Station. OCF’s StewardShip Program celebrates the Fair’s sustainability and philanthropy. Check out the full line up of workshops and performances at the Stewardship in Xavanadu and to participate in the OCF Scavenger Hunt. Stop by our booth to learn about the Birds of the Fair and get your StewardShip Passport Book stamped!

CLICK HERE to visit the OCF website for information about the fair’s circus, comedy, dance, poetry, and musical lineups, activities and workshops, food, and nearby lodging.

About the Oregon Country Fair (from OCF website):

The Oregon Country Fair (OCF) creates events and experiences that nourish the spirit, explore living artfully and authentically on earth, and transform culture in magical, joyous and healthy ways.

The OCF is an annual three-day festival offering the finest in entertainment, hand-made crafts, delectable food and information sharing. The Fair takes place in Veneta, Oregon, about 15 miles west of Eugene. The Fair takes place in a wooded setting with its own water and communication systems, security team, recycling service, and much, much more. We enjoy a mutually cooperative relationship with our neighbors and a solid niche in the Veneta community. Started in 1969 as a benefit for an alternative school, the OCF has a rich and varied history of alternative arts and performance promotion, educational opportunities, land stewardship and philanthropy.

Ecology of the Birds of Crater Lake National Park Program Series Announced

Crater Lake National Park and Klamath Bird Observatory will present a bird ecology program series this summer and into the fall. These park ranger-led programs will feature a visit to KBO’s bird monitoring station within Crater Lake National Park.

The programs will be on Thursdays, but not every Thursday—please check the Crater Lake bird banding visit flyer for scheduled dates. The first program is next Thursday June 28!

Don’t miss this opportunity to visit KBO’s biologists in the field, see the birds they are studying up close—guided by an expert park ranger.

Click here to view the Crater Lake bird banding visit flyer with more information and how to register for these special events.

KBO is also offering public visits to another of our bird monitoring station in the Upper Klamath Lake area by arrangement. Email Bob Frey for more information.

Contact

Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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