Tag: International Programs

Purple Finch photo by James Livaudais

Birding Beyond Borders Video Available

Thank you to everyone that attended Birding Beyond Borders. A special thank you goes to Shannon Rio and Luiza Figueira for presenting about the amazing connection that Klamath Bird Observatory has with Observatório de Aves da Mantiqueira and how this international connection is a great model for bird conservation across the globe. If you missed this presentation you can watch the Zoom recording here. 

If you would like to support KBO and OAMA’s work click here.

To learn more about KBO’s science programs click here.

Upcoming KBO Events

Birding Beyond Borders

Klamath Bird Observatory (KBO) presents Birding Beyond Borders in partnership with Mantiqueira Bird Observatory (OAMa). This presentation celebrates the Klamath Bird Observatory, birds, scientists, conservationists, and people from all parts of our globe. It praises the value of diversity in all of the aspects that nature provides to us: diversity of landscape, diversity of peoples and culture, and how that diversity equals a balanced healthy world.

There will be two parts the first is presented by KBO board president, Shannon Rio. As a tribute to the Klamath Bird Observatory and how it embraces the international aspect of studying and protecting birds. She will be introducing how this has impacted people and the environment with a slideshow and videos.

The second part of the presentation is presented by past KBO intern and Executive Director of OAMa, Luiza Figueira. She will talk about the development of the bird observatory in Brazil, their research and outreach projects to promote bird conservation.

This presentation is free and is on February 24th, 6 pm – 7 pm PT. Click here to register


FUNdraiser — Hawks and Ducks Field Trip

Join KBO board members Amanda Alford and Dick Ashford for an all-day outing on March 5th, where we’ll look at everything “the basin” has to offer. Dick and Amanda will plan a route that will give us our best chances of seeing the varied birdlife for which the Klamath Basin is famous. And, we’ll have lots of fun doing it!

Our KBO FUNdraising events are being offered with Covid safety as our primary concern. Proof of vaccination will be required for all in-person participants. To ensure a Covid-safe, quality experience, we are limiting field trip offerings to a small number of 4-PERSON CAR PODS. One donor will be able to purchase a 1-car ticket for a total of four people to include family members or close friends who make up that donor’s Covid-safe pod. Social distancing and masking when appropriate will also be required. More details about KBO’s Covid-safe guidelines will be provided upon registration.

Click here to register for this all day event. 

 


Bird Conmigo

Join Klamath Bird Observatory for free bilingual bird walks in Medford. We will be exploring local parks highlighting that you do not need to travel far to enjoy birds. For each bird walk, we will cover the basics of birding and introduce you to birds of the Rogue Valley. Making it perfect for beginner birders. You will be able to take the skills and knowledge learned to bird watch in your own backyard. KBO will be providing binoculars and bird guides during the event. An adventure for the whole familia!

Dates and Locations

March 5th, 10 am – 11 am, Bear Creek Park
April 2nd, 10 am – 11 am, Fichtner Mainwaring Park
May 7th, 10 am – 11 am, Holmes Park
June 4th, 10 am – 11 am, Prescott Park

Click here to learn more and to register!

From Africa to Central America – Forging International Partnerships to Conserve Wildlife

Tropical forests are used by local people for food, timber, and resource extraction. Balancing the needs of local people and the needs of sensitive wildlife has presented scientists with pressing global conservation challenges. To help protect and manage tropical wildlife, Klamath Bird Observatory Research Associate Dr. Jared Wolfe has partnered with academia, governments, and nonprofits in Central Africa and Central America to successfully develop and fund several capacity building grants focused on conserving important habitats at risk of being lost.

Continue reading

Study results represent the first published documentation of El Niño’s influence on the survival of a resident tropical landbird and suggest that mature, un-fragmented forests may offer refuge in a changing climate

Oecologia July 2015

*** SCIENCE BRIEF AND NEWS RELEASE ***

*** FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ***

June 23, 2015

Contact: Jared Wolfe, jdw[AT]klamathbird.org, 262-443-6866

Habitat alteration due to forest clearing and climate change threaten wildlife populations across the globe. To better understand the interacting effects of habitat degradation and climate on bird populations, researchers from the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW), Klamath Bird Observatory, and Costa Rica Bird Observatories spent 12 years studying the White-collared Manakin, a fruit-eating tropical bird, in mature and young forests along the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. During the study, several El Niño and La Niña events—cycles of warm and cold ocean temperatures that influence air temperature and precipitation—resulted in very marked dry and wet annual conditions that allowed researchers to measure differences in manakin survival relative to climatic shifts. Results were recently published as the cover article in the journal Oecologia July 2015 edition.

In young tropical forests, researchers found dramatic decreases in manakins’ survival during dry weather associated with El Niño. Researchers believe that, due to a sparser canopy and their fragmented nature, the young forests were more susceptible to understory drying that reduced fruit production. Conversely, manakins’ survival rates were higher during wet years associated with La Niña events in these young forests where increased moisture and sun exposure likely led to an abundance of fruit resources. In mature forests, researchers observed very stable manakin survival rates regardless of climatic shifts, suggesting a relatively constant abundance of fruit resources.

“The complex structure of mature forest is thought to serve as a climatic refuge, buffering fruiting plants from climatic changes resulting in stable manakin survival,” says Jared Wolfe, a postdoctoral researcher with PSW and Klamath Bird Observatory and the study’s lead author. “Climatic refuges, such as mature tropical forests, may be important for many resident tropical bird species faced with the decreasing availability of mature forests coupled with increases in the severity of El Niño-associated dryness.”

These study results represent the first published documentation of El Niño’s influence on the survival of a resident tropical landbird. Researchers believe that variation in manakin survival between forest types provides insight into the sensitivity of certain species to habitat alteration. “From a management perspective, understanding how climatic events affect biodiversity is critical for the development of science-based conservation strategies,” says Pablo Elizondo, the Costa Rica Bird Observatories’ executive director and co-author of the study.

This publication represents an ongoing collaboration between Klamath Bird Observatory, the US Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and International Programs, and the Costa Rica Bird Observatories.

To view the Oecologia paper click here.

Click here to view a pdf of this science brief and news release.

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