Author: Elva Manquera

KSON Quarterly Meeting

Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network Quarterly Meeting

KSON Quarterly MeetingThe Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network (KSON) is holding its first quarterly meeting of 2022 on Thursday, January 27th from 9-10:30 am. This collaborative regional partnership works to conserve oak habitats on private and public lands in southern Oregon and northern California. The upcoming KSON meeting will include an introductory presentation on the partnership and is open to the public. Please email mlm@klamathbird.org for the Zoom link.

2013 trinity interns cropped (72ppi 4x)

Positions Still Available!

Klamath Bird Observatory is still looking for highly motivated candidates to fill our bird banding internship and point count technician positions.

Point count field technicians work from May 2nd through July 15th (some positions available through July 29th), to complete point count surveys throughout the diverse and beautiful regions of southern Oregon, eastern Oregon, and/or northern California. Technicians will work on multiple projects consisting of monitoring effects of oak and stream restoration and long-term monitoring in both private and public lands. Surveyors will work in the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Lassen Volcanic National Park, Crater Lake National Park, Oregon Caves National Monument, eastern Oregon sagebrush habitat, and more. Applicants should be able to identify a large variety of Western birds as they may be working in a range of habitats including oak woodlands, riparian areas, coniferous forests, montane meadows, and shrub-steppe.  Click here to learn more about the point count position.

Bird banding interns participate in our long-term landbird monitoring program. This position requires independent drive and patience for the travails of fieldwork but also affords an amazing opportunity to build practical experience in field biology and master a variety of bird monitoring and research skills in a beautiful part of the country. Click here to learn more about our bird banding internship. 

 

“Forest for the Birds Webinar”: Effectiveness Monitoring – Evaluating the Effects of Forest Management on Bird Populations

Forest for the Birds

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Forest Ecology Working Group, National Conservation Training Center, and Migratory Bird Program have developed a 12-part monthly lecture series to address the 50-year decline of 3 billion birds through partnerships, conservation science, and forest management. The series tells a compelling story about forest bird population declines, partnership opportunities, and forest management actions that can support bird population recovery and sustainability. Klamath Bird Observatory’s executive director John Alexander will be hosting a webinar on January 18th at 10 am PT, “Effectiveness Monitoring – Evaluating the Effects of Forest Management on Bird Populations”.

John will be discussing the monitoring triad: implementation, effectiveness, and validation monitoring. The data management tools that allow synthesis over large areas over long time periods. How population models address issues through management and the importance of feedback loops.

Click Here to register for the webinar.

 

Bureau of Land Management’s National Conservation Partnership Award 2021

Oak Restoration Tour (c) Jamie Stephens

The Medford District BLM is pleased to nominate the Klamath Bird Observatory (KBO) for the BLM Conservation Partner Award. KBO has been our partner for over 20 years in which they have run a network of southwestern Oregon bird banding/monitoring stations including two stations for BLM (Medford and Lakeview Districts). However, we want to especially highlight their more recent activities that have directly improved the Medford District’s on-the-ground conservation actions.

“Public lands management requires collaboration and science-based strategies to address pressing natural resource issues,” said Elizabeth Burghard, District Manager for the BLM Medford District. “I’m honored to celebrate the work of the Klamath Bird Observatory in advancing bird conservation on public lands.”

KBO has been instrumental in applying avian science to inform oak conservation, a locally imperiled vegetation habitat in southwest OR. The 2016 Southwest OR Resource Management Plan identified oak systems as a unique plant habitat with specific management direction and support a high diversity of birds and other wildlife species. Oak systems are prominently represented on Medford BLM lands but are threatened by conifer encroachment, invasive species, and fragmentation. KBO has continued to coordinate the Klamath-Siskiyou Oak Network, which recently completed a Strategic Conservation Action Plan (SAP) and Companion Summary that serves as a roadmap for achieving continued and accelerated oak woodland conservation across the Bioregion. The SAP identifies a gradient of oak habitats in southwest OR that have unique threats and conservation strategies. One of these unique habitat gradients is southwest OR oak/chapparal. KBO continues to conduct avian monitoring to inform ecologically functioning habitat structure and arrangement to support bird biodiversity and has recently incorporated results from a 2019 field study examining chaparral-associated bird density in retention patches into an existing chaparral Decision Support Tool and into the Southern Oregon and Northern California Oak Landowner Guide (KBO and LRP 2014).

KBO has been banding birds and training banding interns for more than 20 years across the BLM Medford District. (c) Julia Rodrigues

KBO also works closely with the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, located in the Medford District. In 2020, they worked with the Monument ecologist to install 20 long-term permanent breeding bird transects that are designed to track population trends in the oak woodland community. This is a collaborative regional program between the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and KBO that will provide valuable information on bird population trends within the Monument and in the surrounding region. The Monument also works closely with KBO studying the Oregon Vesper Sparrow, a species of concern that has been petitioned for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act. KBO is working to produce a series of products to inform conservation actions for this BLM Special Status Species. Specifically, they are identifying breeding ground limitations to nest success and productivity, as well as habitat relationships. This information will highlight potential management conservation actions. KBO is actively providing valuable education through social media, blogs, and web content that promotes the importance of BLM lands for this imperiled species.

Additionally, KBO is involved in several local partnerships, including the Rogue Forest Partners, comprised of ten partners, including non-profit organizations and federal and state forest land managers, who are engaging with private landowners and diverse communities to implement a Rogue Basin Cohesive Forest Restoration Strategy. Currently the partnership is implementing restoration across public and private lands in southwest Oregon with support of Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) funding. This partnership is already leveraging additional dollars to contribute toward fuel reduction and forest restoration across all-lands. KBO serves a critical role in the partnership, continuing to bring and emphasize the importance of science and the role of birds as indicators to inform and improve natural resource management actions.

Finally, KBO has been a state and national BLM partner in developing the Avian Knowledge Network, analyzing years of monitoring data, as well as helping to lead Partners In Flight (PIF) and the PIF Western Working Group. Most recently KBO has played an important role as we develop a strategy to establish Motus towers throughout Oregon and Washington. KBO has been our key partner in developing PIF bird conservation plans for the northwest. They are our go-to partner for bird conservation in Oregon!


The Bureau of Land Management manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 11 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $111 billion in economic output across the country in fiscal year 2020—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 498,000 jobs.

Glen Woolfenden Award 2019

John Alexander, PhD

In 2019, the North American Banding Council (NABC), award John Alexander with the Glen Wooldfenden Award. John served on the council for 13 years and was chair for 4 of those years. He helped shape NABC to be a leader in sound and ethical banding techniques. John represented NABC at various ornithological forums, helping NABC gain the recognition it has today. With the donation of his own time and resources of the Klamath Bird Observatory, NABC was able to achieve goals and priorities it would not have otherwise. John pioneered the efforts to lead training and certification sessions in Latin America. By training and encouraging countless banders, he enhanced the science and ethics of the entire banding community including the eight current members serving on the council.


The Glen Woolfenden Award is eligible for outgoing NABC council members. In recognition of outstanding service and contribution to the Council. Glen Everett Woolfenden, PhD., long-time AOU representative to the NABC, was one of the original supporters of the NABC and was important in garnering support from the ornithological community for this endeavor.  He served on the publications committee from its inception and chaired that committee for several years.  The NABC publications benefited greatly from his superb editing skills.  Those of us who worked with Glen will miss his humor, professionalism, and attention to detail.

KBO’s International Capacity Building fosters training and information exchange throughout the Americas. Our international programming includes recruiting student volunteer interns from outside the US for our banding training program, participation in international banding training projects, and research collaborations and technical support partnerships with bird observatories in Latin America and the Caribbean. Long-running partnerships with US Forest Service International Programs and Oregon State University make this work possible.

 

 

Bird Banding Internship

Klamath Bird Observatory is seeking highly motivated individuals to participate in our long-term landbird monitoring program. This position requires independent drive and patience for the travails of fieldwork but also affords an amazing opportunity to build practical experience in field biology and master a variety of bird monitoring and research skills in a beautiful part of the country.

Our bander training program blends an intensive field internship with coursework designed in accordance with North American Banding Council (NABC) standards to prepare participants for successful careers as field ornithologists. Training and duties will include mist-netting and banding of passerines and near passerines; bird surveying; data quality-assurance, entry, and management; and participation in public outreach and education. Non-field duties include study and discussion of banding curriculum, equipment maintenance, field station upkeep, and data entry. Accommodation is provided in shared rooms in a rustic cabin on the Upper Klamath Lake which has potable running water, a full kitchen, internet access, a wood stove, and electric space heaters, and an external bathhouse. Hiking and birding opportunities abound nearby with access to bikes and kayaks. Weekly visits to remote sites will require multi-night camping trips and brief strenuous hiking carrying heavy banding equipment. Click here to learn more about the internship. 

Bird Banding Internship

Klamath Bird Observatory is seeking highly motivated individuals to participate in our long-term landbird monitoring program. This position requires independent drive and patience for the travails of fieldwork but also affords an amazing opportunity to build practical experience in field biology and master a variety of bird monitoring and research skills in a beautiful part of the country.

Our bander training program blends an intensive field internship with coursework designed in accordance with North American Banding Council (NABC) standards to prepare participants for successful careers as field ornithologists. Training and duties will include mist-netting and banding of passerines and near passerines; bird surveying; data quality-assurance, entry, and management; and participation in public outreach and education. Non-field duties include study and discussion of banding curriculum, equipment maintenance, field station upkeep, and data entry. Accommodation is provided in shared rooms in a rustic cabin on the Upper Klamath Lake which has potable running water, a full kitchen, internet access, a wood stove, and electric space heaters, and an external bathhouse. Hiking and birding opportunities abound nearby with access to bikes and kayaks. Weekly visits to remote sites will require multi-night camping trips and brief strenuous hiking carrying heavy banding equipment.

Laura Cardenas Ortiz Banding intern banding at CABN 20080522 cropped (72ppi 4x)QUALIFICATIONS: Successful candidates will demonstrate a strong interest in birds and field biology, possess a positive attitude during long days and occasionally adverse conditions (heat, cold, mosquitoes, smoke), work cooperatively and constructively toward project objectives, give priority to safety considerations, make common-sense decisions about wildlife (bear, cougar), and be able to work and live harmoniously in close company with coworkers. To preserve the quality and consistency of our long-term dataset, interns must also be able to precisely follow protocols and take meticulous care in collecting and recording data. Excellent communication skills are critical. Interns are required to possess a valid Driver’s License and clean driving record to use provided field vehicles for project-related travel. Preferred qualifications include outdoor skills, sight and sound bird identification skills, bird handling, and banding experience. This position requires early mornings (pre-dawn), weekends, and the ability to follow a work schedule that is dependent on the changing weather and unpredictable field conditions. Interns must be willing and able to adhere to strict health and safety guidelines for banding safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Effective June 21, 2021, KBO will require that all Employees and Interns be fully vaccinated for COVID-19, and be able to provide proof of vaccination status.

STIPEND: $750 Monthly plus accommodations.

Durations: May 1st – October 31st

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Ongoing until the position has been filled. Offers are contingent on the status of the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent health and safety mandates throughout the field season.

TO APPLY: Send cover letter, resume, and contact information for three references in a single PDF document to Bird Banding Research Biologist, Claire Stuyck (cms@klamathbird.org).

Avian Internship Memorial Fund — In Memory of Patricia Buettner

Patty Buettner Upper Klamath Lake

The Avian Internship Memorial Fund (AIM Fund) was started by the friends and family, of longtime KBO partner Patricia Buettner (Patty). The AIM Fund helps support KBO’s long-running internship programs by providing matching annual donations. 

Patty Buettner’s Family and friends have established this annual fund in her honor. During her life, Patty was personally and professionally committed to wildlife conservation and made significant contributions to the field. Among them was her formative influence on the creation of the Klamath Bird Observatory. Patty was responsible for the 1st federal grant, offered by the Bureau of Land Management, that KBO received to enable the creation of our Upper Klamath Field Station, and in doing so, encouraging the US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Bureau of Reclamation to become regular supporters of KBO’s research, monitoring, conservation, and education programs in the Klamath Basin. Through her vision, Patty seeded what has now grown into decades of partnerships with federal agencies, NGOs, businesses, community members, and political representatives in the Klamath Basin. To read more about Patty click here

By donating to the AIM Fund, you are helping KBO to continue educating young scientists interested in avian conservation. These funds help cover housing, supplies, travel costs, stipends, and other internship needs. Click here to donate.

 

Don’t Miss the Last KBO FUNdraiser of the Year!

For our last event, a special online holiday workshop, we have unlimited capacity! On Thursday, December 16th learn how to animate Snoopy and Woodstock. Larry Leichliter, former PEANUTS director and accomplished animator, will host a live-action tutorial. Join us for th isfamily friendly event. Registration is open to an unlimited number of participants. Since this is a FUNdraising event, we ask registrants to make a donation of their choice, use code PIF2021 to register for free. CLICK HERE to learn more and to register now.

Conservation Stamp Set

Each year, KBO offers a Conservation Stamp Set for purchase with proceeds supporting both national and regional conservation efforts. The two-stamp set includes:

1) The Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp (the Duck Stamp), and

2) KBO’s Conservation Science Stamp.

The stamps feature art from Richard Clifton and Gary Bloomfield.

CLICK HERE to order your stamps now!

Perks: With the stamps you receive free access to National Wildlife Refuges that charge fees and discounts on some KBO events.

The Federal Duck Stamp is among the most successful conservation tools ever created. Duck Stamp sales contribute directly to habitat conservation on our National Wildlife Refuges. KBO’s Conservation Science Stamp builds on this success by bringing additional support and attention to our regional science-driven conservation efforts.

By purchasing this set of conservation stamps, birders and hunters alike contribute directly to conservation efforts that benefit all birds. Together we are a powerful voice for conservation and together, by purchasing the Conservation Stamp Set, we are saying:

We believe conservation of non-game birds, gamebirds, and endangered species is a priority for our society.

Klamath Bird Observatory’s 2021-2022 conservation science stamp features our partner Avian Knowledge Network (AKN). The AKN’s mission is to support a network of people, data, and technology to improve bird conservation, management, and research across organizational boundaries and spatial scales. We envision a world where bird populations thrive through conservation and management informed by a network of avian knowledge. AKN does this by providing science-based information about bird populations and habitats to inform natural resource management planning and to advance ecosystem conservation. To learn more about the AKN visit Avian Knowledge Northwest, a regional node of the AKN.

 

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541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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