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News Release: Population and Habitat Objectives for Landbirds in Prairies, Oak, and Riparian Habitats of Western Oregon and Washington

The newly released conservation plan, Population and Habitat Objectives for Landbirds in Prairies, Oak, and Riparian Habitats of Western Oregon and Washington (Rockwell et al 2022), provides quantitative and multi-scaled population and habitat objectives for 26 focal and seven imperiled bird species. As the title suggests, the plan focuses on prairie, oak, and riparian habitats in the Puget Lowlands, Willamette Valley, and Klamath Mountains ecoregions of western Oregon and Washington. This document was prepared for the Oregon-Washington Chapter of Partners in Flight (PIF), Pacific Birds Habitat Joint Venture, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Forest Service.

What exactly is a bird’s eye view of the forest?

At Klamath Bird Observatory, we frequently tell the story of birds knowing our forests better than we do. Using birds as indicators, we’ve applied our science across the diverse and beautiful Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion to understand the ecological change from a bird’s perspective and used that information to inform conservation planning and restoration design. But what exactly is a bird’s eye view of the forest?

Educational Videos from Vesper Meadow

Klamath Bird Observatory has been working with Vesper Meadow to engage and educate the community on the Oregon Vesper Sparrow. Vesper Meadow created two educational videos on the work that is being done to help this imperiled species by KBO and other partners. Follow the link to find these videos and learn more about the “little brown job”.

Bird Monitoring in the Upper Applegate Watershed

The Upper Applegate Watershed, located south of Ruch in Jackson County, Oregon, is a 52,000-acre USFS and BLM planning area among the region’s highest priorities for forest restoration. As part of a new project led by Rogue Forest Partners, over 18,000 acres of forested lands in the Upper Applegate Watershed are receiving restoration treatments over the next few years. Project benefits include improved forest health, protecting the surrounding communities from wildfire, and supporting climate resilience to mixed conifer forests that host many species of plants and animals.

Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network Quarterly Meeting

The Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network (KSON) is holding its first quarterly meeting of 2022 on Thursday, January 27th from 9-10:30 am.

Conservation Stamp Set

Klamath Bird Observatory’s 2021-2022 conservation science stamp features our partner Avian Knowledge Network (AKN). The AKN’s mission is to support a network of people, data, and technology to improve bird conservation, management, and research across organizational boundaries and spatial scales. By purchasing this set of conservation stamps, birders and hunters alike contribute directly to conservation efforts that benefit all birds.

Give a Gift For Bird Conservation

In celebration of giving Tuesday, the Rogue Valley The Messenger recognized KBO, along with other local non-profits, encouraging readers to donate to each of the organizations. KBO’s resilience is bolstered by the support we receive from our donors and we ask you to join Rogue Valley Messenger with your support for our continued efforts to protect birds. Also, as you plan you holiday shopping, consider giving a gift of bird conservation by purchasing KBO’s conservation stamp set for your bird loving family members and friends. Lastly, when holiday shopping remember to visit visiting Sunday Afternoons in Ashland and Wild Bird Unlimited in Medford — as KBO sponsors these two local stores are valued KBO supporters.

Oak Landowner Guide Available Now!

A popular free outreach publication authored by Klamath Bird Observatory and Lomakatsi Restoration Project that provides guidance for private landowners interested in implementing oak habitat restoration on their land, originally published in 2015 , has been re-printed with some minor updates and is available now. The document, entitled Restoring Oak Habitats in Southern Oregon and Northern California: A Guide for Private Landowners, emerged from a collaborative project involving a suite of private and public conservation partners, including the Bureau of Land Management (Medford District), US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Klamath Basin Audubon Society, Oregon State University, American Bird Conservancy, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Understory Initiative, and Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network.

Using a bird’s eye view to help balance wildlife habitat needs and fire-resilient forests

Rogue Forest Partners are working across public and private lands to reduce risks of unnaturally extreme wildfires, promote climate adaptation, and restore resilient landscapes in the Rogue Basin. Klamath Bird Observatory is working with Rogue Forest Partners to apply science using birds as ecological indicators to inform restoration planning and measure ecological response. The partnership aligns with Klamath Bird Observatory’s mission to advance bird conservation and specifically aligns with our work to halt and reverse the decline of western forest birds.

Birdwatching at Dunn Ranch with the Klamath Bird Observatory (July 8th)

Klamath Bird Observatory is excited about our new partnership with the Dunn Ranch Center for Food and Agriculture. At Dunn Ranch they choose nature and demonstrate regenerative farming and a food culture that supports human and planet health. Their mission is “to learn, innovate, and rebuild our food system.” Together, in collaboration with Dunn Ranch, […]

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Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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Tax ID# 93-1297400

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