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Upper Rogue Oak Initiative in the Rogue Valley Times

On February 23rd, Klamath Siskiyou Oak Network was featured in the Rogue Valley Times. A $13-million effort to restore health to oak tree habitat in the Lake Creek area east of White City and near the Table Rocks north of Medford is in its second year. So far, the thinning of conifers that were competing with oaks has taken place on about 200 acres near Lake Creek and on 100 acres near the Table Rocks. The community of Lake Creek is located about 12 miles east of White City, near the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. The work, known as the Upper Rogue Oak Initiative, is due to take place on 3,650 acres — nearly 6 square miles — of private and public land, all but 250 acres of it near Lake Creek. Partners include state and federal agencies, along with conservation organizations, functioning under an umbrella group known as the Klamath Siskiyou Oak Initiative. The project is slated to take six years to complete.

NEWS RELEASE: Using Life Cycles of Culturally Significant Birds to Inform Timing of Prescribed Burns

Pacific Southwest Research Station and Klamath Bird Observatory ecologists recently published new findings about using life cycles of culturally significant birds to inform the timing of prescribed burns in the Klamath Siskiyou Bioregion of Northern California and southern Oregon. The research was a collaborative effort with partners from the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources, Michigan Technological University, and others.

Meet Banding Intern Giselle Ragoonanan

Meet banding intern Giselle Lares Ragoonanan. She is an indigenous naturalist, assistant field researcher, nature soundscape recorder, and wildlife conservationist. Her home is the twin island of Trinidad and Tobago at the end of the Caribbean archipelago. KBO is very excited to have her as an intern this year and are grateful for partnerships like BirdCaribbean for helping to make it happen. Follow the link below to learn more about Giselle and learn about the next banding station outing on September 28th.

A Decade of Collaborative Oak Restoration

Since 2011, KSON partners have accomplished thousands of acres of strategic ecological restoration to enhance oak habitat, build climate resilience, bolster cultural resources, and reduce wildfire risk to the ecosystem and communities. The handout A Decade of Collaborative Oak Restoration demonstrates the power of collaboration and a decade-plus of successful oak habitat restoration from 2011-2023 with highlights from Table Rock and Colestin Valley projects.

Save the Date – Brazil 2024

We invite you to join the directors of Klamath Bird Observatory and Mantiqueira Bird Observatory for a 10-day adventure exploring the Atlantic Forest of southeastern Brazil. The trip will be held August 20-29, 2024. Registration for the Brazil trip will open on September 20th. 

Fall FUNdraising and Outreach Events

 The Klamath Bird Observatory board members are excited to introduce our fall outreach and FUNdraising events. Open for registration now is Shannon’s Let’s Talk Birds series. These inperson presentation will be held in the KBO office Monday September 11th, 18th, and 25th wrapping up with a field trip on Saturday September 30th or Oct 1st. We are also announcing Save the Dates for a Great Grey Owl presentation by Harry Fuller, Ashland History walk’s with Jeff LaLande and several trips with Dick Ashford.

Vacation for Conservation

Join KBO’s dynamic duo Director of Conservation Jaime Stephens and Board President Shannon Rio for a memorable 9-day trip to Brazil, April 12th – 20th, 2023. This trip will be guided by past KBO intern and co-founder of Mantiqueira Bird Observatory (OAMa) Luiza Figueira. The cost of this trip includes hotels, food (breakfast, lunch, dinner), and transportation (to and from the airport and during the trip). The total cost of the trip is $5,000, $2500 to reserve your seat, and the total amount is due by February 10th. With 12 people attending, these funds will cover a FULL YEAR of OAMa’s banding program. It will also be used to help support a student intern that is participating in KBO OAMa’s intern exchange program. 

Cocktails for a Cause

Join KBO for drinks on Tuesday, December 20th, 5 pm – 8 pm at Lune Cafe in Ashland, OR. $2 from every specialty cocktail or lemonade will be donated to KBO. You can also purchase tickets for a 50/50 raffle. It is the perfect way to have drinks with family and friends this holiday season and support a local conservation organization. Can’t make it on the 20th? This holiday fundraiser runs till December 31st. 

State of the Birds 2022 – There is hope for declining forest bird species

To help us tell the story about how sustained forest management investments in the Klamath Siskiyou Bioregion may benefit birds, we invited Executive Director Terry Fairbanks from the Southern Oregon Forest Restoration Collaborative (SOFRC) to provide a testimonial. KBO is bringing multiple voices to the table to coalesce around a forest conservation movement to ensure investment if forest restoration benefits birds and people. As we restore our forest from years of fire suppression using birds to guide conservation action and evaluate restoration success, we are telling a complete ecosystem story. KBO Executive Director John Alexander, a contributor to the Report, gave a live interview with Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley, discussing this story. Terry Fairbanks’s video interview and John’s recorded interview can both be found in this blog.

2022 U.S. State of the Birds Report Reveals Widespread Losses of Birds Due to Habitat Stress

A newly released State of the Birds report for the United States reveals a tale of two trends, one hopeful, one dire. Historically we have demonstrated that investment in bird conservation can pay off – for example, we have recovered at-risk species like waterfowl and the Peregrine Falcons by focused resources and efforts. However, North American populations continue to show widespread declines. In the west, forest-dependent and wetland birds are both showing a more recent decline that is of grave concern.