Tag: Klamath Bird Observatory

It’s September in the Year of the Bird!

Our Call to Action this September in the Year of the Bird is to do everything we can to help birds have a safe migration this fall. Each year, billions of birds migrate north in the spring and south in the fall. Along the way, though, they now face all sorts of human-made challenges. Whether it be from vast expanses of concrete to invisible windows and confusing artificial lights, the number of migrating birds that die every year is estimated to be as many as 1 billion.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Making windows bird-safe, turning off your lights, planting native plants, encouraging bird-friendly architecture in your community—these are all ways you can help birds have a safer migration. So for September, our Year of the Bird ask is to do everything you can to help birds have a safe migration this fall. You can read more about how to do this and how lights and windows pose dangers to migrating birds in the featured Year of the Bird post and KBO info handouts below.

CLICK HERE to visit the National Audubon Society’s September’s Featured Action: Help Birds Have a Safe Migration post.

And check out KBO’s info handouts: Reducing Bird Collisions with Windows, Birdify Your Yard, and Cats and Wildlife—available at our website (see link below).

CLICK HERE to view KBO’s Reducing Bird Collisions with Windows info handout.

CLICK HERE to view KBO’s Birdify Your Yard info handout.

CLICK HERE to view KBO’s Cats and Wildlife info handout.

 

2018 is Year of the Bird! The National Geographic Society is celebrating the centenary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act with a year-long celebration of birds. Dozens of Year of the Bird partners, including Klamath Bird Observatory, are coordinating Year of the Bird activities.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the Year of the Bird at the National Geographic Society’s website.

KBO’s NorCal crew collects bird data for riparian restoration (and learns to kayak!)

Conducting field research always comes with its fair share of unexpected obstacles, and the 2018 season was no exception. This year KBO began a new partnership with the Salmon River Restoration Council (SRRC) in northern California. The Salmon River has a long history of human impacts, particularly due to mining, and the SRRC has plans to restore several sites along the North and South Forks to

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Just a Few Spots Remaining for The Art of Bird Photography Class this Wednesday!

September 19, Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm at 320 Beach Street in Ashland

Presented by Karl Schneck, nature photographer and KBO board member

Birding and photography have been Karl Schneck’s passions for over 50 years, so it’s a perfect combination for him to photograph birds. Not that long ago, it was difficult to get decent bird photos because many birds are small, move quickly, often in dim light, and difficult to approach. Modern digital photographic equipment has made the task much easier if the basic principles are understood. Along with reviewing different types of equipment for digital bird photography, Karl will go over techniques for getting the pictures and then post-processing them to improve them as your tastes dictate.

His photography is about the birds and first requires the planning of the conditions, such as the light source and direction, wind, and background/foreground. The next step is setting the camera according to the environment and the desired outcome. And finally, the finishing touches with post-processing (Photoshop and others). The goal of the class is to present the options for bird photography and the ways to accomplish your requirements.

Registration for this special class is $20.00 with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs. Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

Banding Station Visit Opportunities Continue This Fall

Klamath Bird Observatory is offering public visits to our bird banding station near Fort Klamath in the Upper Klamath Lake area. The banding station is scheduled on Monday mornings through October 8. Individual, family, and group visits can be arranged by emailing KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey (see below).

Situated along Sevenmile Creek within Fremont-Winema National Forest, this banding station has been operated each year during the nesting and fall migration seasons since 1997—one of the longest running bird monitoring sites in the region. In the fall, many songbird species migrate through the Klamath Basin and can be encountered here. The location is also a birding hotspot on the Klamath Basin Birding Trail.

Also, KBO and Crater Lake National Park continue our bird ecology program series into the fall. These Ranger-led programs begin at the Park’s Steel Visitor Center and feature a visit to KBO’s banding station within Crater Lake National Park. The programs are scheduled on Thursday mornings—please check the Crater Lake National Park series flyer (see below) for upcoming dates and more details.

Don’t miss these opportunities to visit KBO’s biologists in the field and see the birds they are studying up close!

CLICK HERE to contact KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey to arrange a visit to KBO’s Sevenmile Creek banding station.

CLICK HERE to view the Crater Lake National Park bird banding visit flyer with more information and how to register.

CLICK HERE to view the Klamath Basin Birding Trail website for birding hotspot descriptions, maps, and other local birding resources.

KBO TALK AND WALK CLASSES THIS FALL

FINDING AND PHOTOGRAPHING THE GREAT GRAY OWL OF THE CASCADES
Presented by Mel Clements

Talk: September 28th Friday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Great Gray Owl photographer Mel Clements will speak on his experience of photographing the Great Gray Owls of the Cascades. The presentation includes an introduction to the Great Gray Owl, its habitat, and the ethics of finding and photographing this magnificent, yet reclusive owl. His talk is accompanied by 43 of his photographs, a five minute dvd set to music, and small exhibit of framed photographs.

Walk: September 29th Saturday 6:30am-1:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

We will leave early so that we can arrive in the Cascade Lakes area at sunrise. Pack a lunch and dress warmly. Morning temperatures are around 37 degrees. Participants will car pool. Don’t forget to bring your binoculars! More information about the field trip will be given out during the Friday evening presentation.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

 

CREATING A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN YOUR BACKYARD
Presented by Karl Schneck, KBO board member

Talk: October 18th Thursday 6:30-8:00pm at 320 Beach Street (old Lincoln School), Ashland, Oregon

Karl’s life-long passion for birds has guided the landscaping on his property in the foothills just outside Ashland, Oregon. In this talk, he will present the many ways a backyard can be made more attractive and useful for birds in our region. He will also introduce the feathered neighbors that now live on or have visited his backyard and who will be likely seen during the field trip.

In Karl’s words …
“With 117 species in just over three years, I feel especially grateful for the abundance of birds seen on our property two miles north of I-5 on N. Valley View Road. which consists of several habitats, including riparian, oak woodland, and grasslands. I’ve had quite a few days when I’ve traveled to see the birds and came home wondering why I didn’t just stay at home and see more species (of course, there are benefits to seeing new areas). However, when I get too old to tromp through the forests and swamps, there is comfort in knowing that I can sit on my deck and enjoy a multitude of birds.

We are still in the process of planting and improving our yard habitat for the birds. Watching the hummers feed from our penstemons is one example of adding features for the birds, as well as feeders, water, and shelter. Adding features for specific birds can be rewarding when your target bird shows up. Across the road, Bald Eagles come in to feed on the afterbirth of the cows. This year I had Barn Owl, American Kestrel, Acorn Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Golden Eagle (about a mile away), Bullock’s Oriole, Brewer’s Blackbird, Western Kingbird, Oak Titmouse, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, California Towhee, and undoubtedly a number of others I didn’t know about, nesting on the property.

All these birds bring great joy to my life and make a great start to the day when I walk outside in the morning and take them all in. So, my goal for this class is to share my birds with you in a walk and a light lunch, hoping you will enjoy them as much as I do.”

Walk: October 20th Saturday 8:00am-12:00pm – meet at 320 Beach Street, Ashland, Oregon

This is a field trip to Karl’s property on the edge of Ashland—bring your binoculars! Lunch will be provided (included with registration fee) on Karl’s birdy patio where the birding adventure will continue.

Fee for this Talk and Walk class is $50 ($40 for holders of the Conservation Stamp Set) with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

 

And previously announced:

THE ART OF BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

September 19, Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm at 320 Beach Street in Ashland

Presented by Karl Schneck, nature photographer and KBO board member

Birding and photography have been Karl’s passions for over 50 years, so it’s a perfect combination for him to photograph birds. Not that long ago, it was difficult to get decent bird photos because many birds are small, move quickly, often in dim light, and difficult to approach. Modern digital photographic equipment has made the task much easier if the basic principles are understood. Along with reviewing different types of equipment for digital bird photography, Karl will go over techniques for getting the pictures and then post-processing to improve them as your tastes dictate.

His photography is about the birds and first requires the planning of the conditions, such as the light source and direction, wind, and background/foreground. The next step is setting the camera according to the environment and the desired outcome. And finally, the finishing touches with post-processing (Photoshop and others). The goal of the class is to present the options for bird photography and the ways to accomplish your requirements.

Registration for this special class is $20.00 with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs.

Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

UPCOMING CLASS: THE ART OF BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

September 19, Wednesday 6:30-8:30pm at 320 Beach Street in Ashland

Presented by Karl Schneck, nature photographer and KBO board member

Birding and photography have been Karl Schneck’s passions for over 50 years, so it’s a perfect combination for him to photograph birds. Not that long ago, it was difficult to get decent bird photos because many birds are small, move quickly, often in dim light, and difficult to approach. Modern digital photographic equipment has made the task much easier if the basic principles are understood. Along with reviewing different types of equipment for digital bird photography, Karl will go over techniques for getting the pictures and then post-processing them to improve them as your tastes dictate.

His photography is about the birds and first requires the planning of the conditions, such as the light source and direction, wind, and background/foreground. The next step is setting the camera according to the environment and the desired outcome. And finally, the finishing touches with post-processing (Photoshop and others). The goal of the class is to present the options for bird photography and the ways to accomplish your requirements.

Registration for this special class is $20.00 with proceeds going directly to support KBO’s science and education programs. Contact Shannon Rio at shannonrio@aol.com or call 541-840-4655 to sign up.

Banding Station Visits Fall 2018

Klamath Bird Observatory is offering public visits to our bird banding station near Fort Klamath in the Upper Klamath Lake area. The banding station is scheduled on Monday mornings through mid-October. Individual, family, and group visits can be arranged by emailing KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey (see below).

Situated along Sevenmile Creek within Fremont-Winema National Forest, this banding station has been operated each year during the nesting and fall migration seasons since 1997—one of the longest running bird monitoring sites in the region. In the fall, many songbird species migrate through the Klamath Basin and can be encountered here. The location is also a birding hotspot on the Klamath Basin Birding Trail.

Also, KBO and Crater Lake National Park continue our bird ecology program series into the fall. These Ranger-led programs begin at the Park’s Steel Visitor Center and feature a visit to KBO’s banding station within Crater Lake National Park. The programs are scheduled on Thursday mornings—please check the Crater Lake National Park series flyer (see below) for upcoming dates and more details.

Don’t miss these opportunities to visit KBO’s biologists in the field and see the birds they are studying up close!

CLICK HERE to contact KBO’s Banding Program Coordinator Bob Frey to arrange a visit to KBO’s Sevenmile Creek banding station.

CLICK HERE to view the Crater Lake National Park bird banding visit flyer with more information and how to register.

CLICK HERE to view the Klamath Basin Birding Trail website for birding hotspot descriptions, maps, and other local birding resources.

Klamath Bird 2018 Summer Edition

The 2018 Summer edition of our KLAMATH BIRD newsletter is available at our website. A Field Day Edition!
Observations from Our Biologists Afield tells the many tales of KBO’s monitoring and research work in 2018. Also, our upcoming Wings and Wine Gala, a new bird bio, Words on the Wind, and more!

Click here to view the 2018 Summer Klamath Bird.

All past newsletters beginning  with the inaugural 2001 Winter edition are also online …

Click here for the KLAMATH BIRD newsletters archive.

2018 KBO Banding Workshop a Fun Success!

KBO hosted the 2018 Fundamentals of Bird Banding Workshop at our Upper Klamath Lake Field Station August 6-10. Biologists from near and far—California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Nicaragua, the Marianas Islands, and Spain (!)—joined KBO’s banding team for four days of interactive hands-on instruction and afternoon seminars. Topics ranged from safe mist net use in capturing small birds to age- and sex-determination techniques in this the North American Banding Council-sanctioned training workshop. The fantastic group took the “work” out of workshop and made it all a lot of fun! Most of the group now bring new knowledge and sharpened skills to their ongoing banding projects.

Proceeds from the workshop help fund our long-term monitoring and student volunteer internship programs. KBO has hosted bird banding workshops at our Upper Klamath Lake Field Station for over 20 years—an important component of our professional education program.

CLICK HERE to learn more about KBO’s Professional Education Program.

KBO Science Director wins Leadership in Conservation Award

The accomplishments of Klamath Bird Observatory’s Science Director Jaime Stephens have been recognized by the international bird conservation consortium Partners in Flight (PIF)—presenting her with its prestigious Leadership in Conservation Award. The Leadership Award honors an individual or group that demonstrates outstanding guidance and direction that contributes, or has contributed, to advancing Partners in Flight conservation efforts. Jaime accepted the award at the North American Wildlife & Natural Resources Conference in Virginia earlier this year.

In nominating Jaime, colleague Barb Bresson, Regional Avian Program Manager with the US Forest Service and 2013 Leadership Awardee, stated “Jaime exemplifies excellence in leadership as KBO’s Science Director supervising and mentoring a team of incredibly effective, passionate, and productive biologists while also actively engaging and taking on leadership roles in PIF and within other conservation focused initiatives.”

Since her start with KBO in 2002, Jaime has placed her indelible stamp on bird conservation at all scales, local to international. It is the breadth and depth of her accomplishments that prompted this recognition. As Science Director, she directs the science program at KBO, conducting and publishing her own work on bird conservation but collaborates extensively with colleagues on other science. She has been instrumental in driving the discussion on bird data management nationally, has led the way for bird conservation partnerships across the west to greater and more permanent conservation action, and continues to seek new opportunities to improve and align bird conservation. Her effectiveness stems from her steadfast belief in a data-driven approach to bird conservation science, and from her infectious enthusiasm, optimism, and engaging leadership style which brings together partners from similar and disparate groups.

Jaime served as Chair of the Western Working Group of Partners in Flight (WWG) for three years (2012-2015). During her tenure, the WWG established new internal policies of governance lending long-term stability to the organization, expanded the Group’s reach and diversity of participants, and advanced new conservation initiatives which continue today. This is consistent with her steady and reasoned leadership style which engenders trust and credibility. When Jaime talks, people listen. Despite having rotated out of the Chair position, Jaime continues to lend her expertise and experience to the WWG, and continues her strong and positive influence on the direction of the WWG’s conservation initiatives in the west, from Mexico to Canada.

Jaime embodies the mission of Partners in Flight—to advance full life-cycle conservation of landbirds in the Americas via sound science, integrated conservation partnerships, habitat delivery on public and private lands, and targeted citizen outreach. Her accomplishments hold significance. Please join us in congratulations to Jaime for this well-deserved recognition.

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Klamath Bird Observatory
541-201-0866
PO Box 758
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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